Could buying art make you rich?

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

For one investor that dream came true. The painting ‘Salvator Mundi’ believed to be painted by Leonardo da Vinci purchased for £45 just sold for $450 million. So, is investing in art a good way to get rich quick? And how should you proceed? “with extreme caution” say financial advisors.

While stories like the recent Leonardo da Vinci sale and endless Antiques Roadshow episodes make it seem very attractive to invest in paintings and objets d’art, such cases are relatively rare. What you get back is based on supply and demand and there are big movements upwards or downwards if particular works or artists come in or out of fashion.

Attending a neighborhood garage sale or popping into a local thrift store can leave a lot to be desired. After sifting through dented furniture, chipped ceramics, and strange art, one is often left feeling that the presented merchandise is worthless. But if you are lucky enough, you may just find a diamond in the rough.

Some Top Garage Sale Finds:

  • $3 for a Ceramic Bowl, Sold at Auction for $2.2 million
  • Andy Warhol Sketch Purchased for $5, Valued at $2 Million
  • 50 Cents for a Painting worth $10,000
  • Tiffany Mirror Purchased for $2, Valued at $25,000

 

Photo of Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)

Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)

The high sale price of the Leonardo painting was not typical, a recent academic study, based on examining data from 1.2 million auction house sales of paintings, drawings and prints, concluded that art appreciated in value by a modest 3.97% per year, in real US dollar terms, between 1957 and 2007.

Given the current environment of low interest rates, that’s still a better return than many savings accounts will give you. Paintings are seen as attractive investments because it’s very clear what you’re buying. Part of this is driven by investors’ desire for “real assets”.

Many investors lost money in the financial crisis by investing in products they did not understand, they are turning back to things such as art. Wealthy clients spend an increasing part of their wealth on art and collectibles.

You don’t necessarily have to be super-wealthy to invest in art.

Affordable Art Fair photoThe ArtInsuranceNow.com sponsored 2017 Spring Affordable Art Fair was an excellent example of great works of art that are accessible.  There are a growing number of art fairs and online marketplaces such as Artfinder aimed at buyers with a more modest budget.

The Affordable Art Fair (AAF), which started out in London’s Battersea Park in 1999, now holds fairs in more than 10 cities around the world. But while it may be becoming more affordable, just don’t bet on becoming a millionaire yourself.

With a keen eye and a lot of luck you may come across a valuable find but most art industry experts suggest that you buy a piece of art because you like it, not because you want to get rich. “If it goes up in value that should be just an added bonus.”

Protect your valued finds by visiting us at ArtInsuranceNow.com, voted a 2017 Top Broker and listed as the “Cream of the crop” in our respective area of Art Insurance by Insurance Business Magazine. We can help with all Art related insurance requirements. Apply here or Contact William Fleischer CIC at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.

Art Insurance for Collectors; Schedule vs. Blanket

The Art of Collecting Art.

There’s a big difference between buying art and collecting art. Buying art is more of a random activity based on likes, preferences or attractions at any given moment while collecting art is more of a purposeful, directed, long-term commitment. An important step in good collecting is not the most delightful one to talk about, but it is among the most necessary, and that is to plan for the unforeseen.

As an art insurance broker, I readily come across collections that are an intricate part of retirement and inheritance planning.  It’s a great asset to pass down.  Baby boomers bought artwork for the love of the art.  Art as an investment vehicle was a small part of the decision-making, not like today which is the main focus.

In the past 15 years as the art market sales and demand took off, Art purchased 40, 30 or even 10 years ago is worth a lot.  Hence, I am seeing collector’s policy limits rise into the millions. I will explain some key differences in the type of policy offered in today’s marketplace. Art Insurance and collectible insurance demands are a new focus with some insurers. Beware, like the art world, no two are the same, read the exclusions, conditions and valuation clauses in a policy.

Understand what schedule means and its limitations, some say the maximum they will pay is what is on the schedule or schedule plus 125% or 150% and then some added or market value whichever is less.  A popular coverage is Blanket Insurance; usually, this is for the collection under $300,000. The advantage is that you are not required to supply the companies with appraisals, bill of sale or any other documentation when you bind the coverage.

Only at the time of loss, the onus of proof of value is on the collector.  This is not a lengthy process; either go back to your paperwork and ask for a current valuation from a dealer or show your work to a dealer and put the value in a letter. Both methods of either scheduling the art or using the blanket limit are tools I use when working with my clients.  Each person looks at insurance in different ways and has different requirements. Let me work with you and answer all your questions to present a program which is satisfactory to all those involved.

Visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com, Apply below or Contact me at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.

William G. Fleischer CIC

 

 

Largest Warhol Collector’s Art Damaged in Storage, is it Covered?

Largest Warhol Collector’s Art Damaged.

Renowned Mugrabi family which owns the largest private cache of Andy Warhol pieces says its business has been brought to a standstill by a company that’s holding its entire $100 Million, 1,300-plus-piece art collection “hostage” at a New Jersey storage facility.

 

In a lawsuit filed in New York City, David Mugrabi accused Mana Contemporary of preventing the family from removing any art from its storage facility in Jersey City since last month.

 

Mana Contemporary had agreed in 2014 to store the collection in exchange for the Mugrabis’ recommendations of Mana’s services to their clients, Mana now wants more than $500,000 for storage fees, according to the complaint, and the company has also damaged 11 works of art in its custody — including pieces by Frank Gehry, Richard Prince and Jenny Saville, according to the suit.

 

Would our Collector’s policy cover the damages?

 

YES! Our Collector’s policy covers Art owned by the Collector and covers damages while in storage. The main focus would be the loss settlement. Restorers and appraisers would evaluate the work to determine the “Current Market Value”, the “Loss of Value”, and the value of the art if scheduled.  Once all information is established, then the insurance company would pay the claim.

 

A Total Loss: the company will pay “current market value” of the property at the time of “loss” or damage occurs. The “loss” or damage shall be ascertained or estimated according to such current market or schedule values.

 

A Partial Loss: The company will pay the Collector an amount mutually agreed upon based on the following:

 

(a) The cost to repair the property to its value immediately before the “loss”; or

 

(b) The difference between the value of the property before and after the “loss”; or

 

(c) The cost to restore the property as nearly as possible to its condition immediately before the “loss”. If the restored value is less than the value immediately before the “loss”, the company will pay the difference between the restored value and the value immediately before the “loss”.

 

Having the right policy in place with the right coverages help to rebuild and or restore amazing collections. The purpose of Insurance is to indemnify and restore the Insured to the situation prior to a loss. Sadly, Art is one of those objects which is very difficult to return to its original grandeur.  Nothing lasts forever, but one would hope, through proper insuring of a collection, it could be rebuilt with similar works or genres.

 

Visit www.ArtInsuranceNow.com to learn more, apply here or feel free to contact William Fleischer, CIC at 1.800.921.1008

Corporate Art Insurance 3 trends

As a leading Art Insurance Broker, I have seen a rise in 3 types of  policies focusing on the Art Corporation are showing in their  businesses.

  1. The rise of using  Art leasing/ renting companies for a short time, rotating exhibition space. These new type of lending services,  fill a niche by adding style to an office by using a wide range of art, Prints, Sculptures, Paintings, Glass and tapestry.  I have insured the works in Doctors’ offices, hospitals, corporate offices and temporary spaces, not to mention in all types of residences.
  2. Pure old fashion Corporate Art insurance. Art can make a space interesting and appealing to visitors or staff. Manny CEO Private Collections are starting to show off their collection. I design policies to insure the art while in the office, in storage or enjoyed at home.
  3. Exhibition Insurance. Many curators are able to assemble a strong show, using a common theme or thread to enhance the corporate culture creativity. They invite Artist or ask Collectors to loan works fulfilling the vision of the project.

 

EZ to apply at  www.artinsurancenow.com