Tag Archives: Transit Insurance for Artist

Artwork in Transit; Managing the Risks

The top risks art collectors might face surprisingly doesn’t include theft. In fact, its art that’s on the move that poses the biggest risk. A large proportion of art claims are derived from transit losses. Private collectors enjoy lending, particularly as exhibitions in major institutions can increase value, that’s all very well until something goes wrong.

The movement of art is massive, now art is transported coast to coast, internationally or just to your winter home or local Gallery. When handling artwork, packing for transportation is a top concern for insurance carriers.

Many policies list as a condition, professional packing, meaning it must be packed as someone in the industry would pack it, safe, secure and protective from breaking if possible.

If you use a transportation service, either a fine art mover, a local mover, or common carrier, you must verify if they have or offer Insurance, what are their limits, conditions and the cost of the coverage. Insurance carriers differ and may have restrictions or limitations while your valuables are on the road, on a ship, or in air transit. The most common, efficient and safe way of moving art over long distances, domestically or internationally is by air transport, but it is very common to move the work yourself, so make sure your policy covers self-conveyance.

Some art transporting choices such as those offered by, United Parcel Service (UPS), DHL, Federal Express (FedEx), and other private art handling companies or commercial air freight carriers have limitations on coverages, territory, and deductibles. Keep in mind that while these are services used for fragile and non-fragile fine art, things happen within their control and outside of their control. Looking to your own insurance policy for protection is the right way to limit your financial losses and the quickest way to have the claim settled.

Artists, art dealers, and institutions use these Art transport services regularly, but Insurance, in particular, is the gray area in which most misunderstandings occur. Pay close attention to the bill of lading and understanding the fine print. The standard form limits the exposure of a claim on the art to weight, not value.

Our policies are written either as a schedule or market value less a percentage. Either way, your art will be protected while in transport. Caution, it’s important when securing transit art insurance to add extra days of transport for the unknown delays. Also note the declared value placed in customs forms or the bill of Lading is usually not used when settling a claim but look for wording which would specify to the contrary.

According to FedEx, “shipments (packages or freight) containing all or part of the following items are limited to a maximum declared value of $500: Artwork, including any work created or developed by the application of skill, taste or creative talent for sale, display or collection.

This includes, but is not limited to, items (and their parts) such as paintings, drawings, vases, tapestries, limited-edition prints, fine art, statuary, sculpture, collectors’ items, customized or personalized musical instruments, Film, photographic images, including photographic negatives, photographic chromes and photographic slides.

Any commodity that by its inherent nature is particularly susceptible to damage, or the market value of which is particularly variable or difficult to ascertain.”

According to UPS, articles of “unusual value” are prohibited from being offered for shipment. This definition explicitly includes “works of art.” As the November New York-based auctions ended and Art Basel Miami Beach began, for collectors buying and selling art no doubt demanded lots of their attention, they also should be thinking about keeping their art safe and properly insured as it moves between locations.

With the expansion of the global art market, risks increase. To discover a larger number of buyers, auction houses and art dealers often display art at multiple locations, including a growing number of art fairs around the world like Art Basel. The high volume of art exchanging hands increases the risk of improper handling and accidental damage and therefore increases the number of fine art insurance claims.

You should know where your art will be stored while in the possession of art dealers or auction houses. This is critical. For example, many consigned works were stored in art gallery basements in Chelsea during Hurricane Sandy, leaving many damaged. Art galleries may also store artwork at an off-site storage facility. Being notified before your piece is moved from one location to another is also a precaution and obtaining confirmation on how it will be packed and transported will help to ensure a smooth consignment process.

Don’t presume that the auction house, gallery owner, art dealer, or shipping company with possession of your artwork has insurance for its loss, theft or damage. It’s very important to have your own fine art policy. Collectors should always consult with an insurance agent. The agent can tailor a policy to a specific collector and discover any special provisions in the collector’s fine art policy.
No matter what risks they face, creating an insurance policy for an art collector requires one-on-one consultation since every art collection is unique, no two collectors are alike and no two collections are alike.

Collectors and their advisers would be wise to work with knowledgeable insurance brokers like Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc.  that can guide you in obtaining the right fine art insurance for your unique requirements. For more info visit www.artinsurancenow.com and live chat with us or call us at 800.921.1008

Art Exhibition Insurance – The Details

As representatives of the top Insurance carriers that insure exhibitions locally, in multi-states and internationally, we know coverages.

Each company has their own distinct forms to insure the unique exposures related to exhibitions. Coverages while in transit, at the exhibition venue, and in storage vary by company.

Below are some highlighted coverages to consider when placing insurance for an exhibition, how to protect the lenders, and what is the right valuation method.

 

About Exhibition Coverage

Most Art Insurance policies not only insure the work on exhibition, but also the didactic and ancillary materials such as vitrines, hardware, technology, and supportive structures.

A typical Policy I use with my insureds exhibition policy includes:

  • Agreed Value: We usually require a schedule prior to binding, but different terms can be negotiated.
  • Worldwide coverage for transit: is important when gathering works from overseas collectors.
  • Named Location: some policy covers only named location and excludes transit
  • Scheduled or Blanket: 
    • The schedule:  Establishes the price of the work to be insured.
    • Blanket: policy usually has a per item cap along with the onus of proof of value is on the insured.
  •  Loss Payee Certificates: These are issued if a lender requires proof of coverage and insures the check will be made to them in case of a loss.

 

  • Additional Important Exhibition Coverages one should verify if covered:
    • Packing crates, catalogs, and brochures included
    • Nail to Nail coverage:Coverage from point of pick up until returned.
    • Goods in transit
    • Art in storage in-between transit

 

  • Broad, all-risk coverage
  • Blanket limits on propertyin your care, custody, and control at scheduled locations and any other unnamed locations. Beware of sub-limits.
  • Domestic and international transit: To/from list of Exhibition Locations
  • No coinsurance clause penalty
  • Valuation clauses: important to know how a loss will be settled. Our policies are designed for the art industry
  • Coverage for jointly-ownedworks of art should be disclosed and understood how a loss will be paid in those instances.
  • Special clauses for “loss buy back” or “pairs and sets”
  • Relaxed appraisal requirements with most companies
  • Based on Consignment value established at time of pick up.

 

About Exhibition Exclusions and Conditions:

These policy forms usually include the standard and not so standard Exhibition polices.

Wear and tear, moth, vermin, and insects.

Damage resulting from any repair, restoration, or retouching process.

Nuclear, radiation, biological or chemical contamination.

War, invasion, an act of foreign enemies, hostilities, military or usurped power.

Confiscated, damaged or destroyed by or order of any government or public or local authority, except if taken at the time of a fire to prevent it’s spread.

In Conclusion: Art insurance has many variables and sections which can be negotiated, if you are a knowledgeable Art Insurance broker.

David Bowie’s Art Collection to be auctioned, how would a collectors policy respond?

Not just David Bowie’s Estate sends work to the art auctions but individual collectors do also.

The most popular conversations I have are collectors looking to insure their work while in transit to an auction house like Christie’s, Sotheby’s, de Pury, and Phillips house.

Many times the auction house will either visit the collection or ask the collector to send the item to be auctioned directly to the house, either to be further evaluated or to be inserted into the auction rotation.

The preferred Collector’s insurance policy I like to sell, include and is not limited to coverage in transit and away from premises, in exhibitions and in storage and does not exclude auction houses.

The evaluation of the Art is based on two different models. Depending on the Art Insurance Company policy wording, One base is on the schedule amounts of the item on file (either with the Insurance company or the Collector) and the other is based on the current market value (onus of proof is on the collector).

In the case of David Bowie, Jim Hendrix or even Robin Williams, the auction house receives these items on consignment and will charge a hefty fee to insure them while on the premises.  I advise my clients to not use auction house insurance because most of the policies I sell have coverage for unnamed locations or broad enough to cover the works given for sale on a stated amount.

One of the downfalls of using the insurance, the auction houses give you, is how their insurance establishes values of the art at claim time.  Usually, it is not based on the artwork consignment agreement but on the lowest estimated value. The cost to you for using their insurance is usually much more expensive than what you are currently paying. The standard auction house’s most common policies have wording to the effect of;

Property of others consigned to you for auction, at the lowest pre-sale estimate” and “Where no consignment receipt exists but the article appears on your records fully described, such property shall be valued at the lowest anticipated pre-sale estimate or the amount for which you are held legally liable, whichever is less”

This may be lower than your schedule or market value to entice attention for a bidding war.

When in doubt, call me to discuss your unique situation.

William

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

How to evaluate your own work as an artist

Since my Launch of an Artist’s Insurance website: I have had numerous conversations regarding “How an Insurance Company evaluates Art.”

The policy evaluation is straightforward. Sales price minus 30%.

This is a simple formula if you have a track record of sales.  Where the conversation turns, is when the artist is new to the market.  I say this because I have worked with artists who, at various ages and experience are now, entering group shows and exhibitions.

A seasoned artist knows the consignment agreement or the exhibition agreement requires the artist to place a value of their Artwork in the form, but for the neophyte, this is where the “tire hits the Road” or the “paint hits the canvas” and takes the discussion deeper.

So what are the methods of pricing one’s own work, and will the insurance company accept the sale price of an artist, who never sold?

This is how I approach the question.

First, everything has a value.  Fundamentally;  material, time, education, experience, teachers, demographics, size shape, media, subject, along with time spent, researching and actually producing the work. etc…

Of course, the Artist understands this, but what is the valuation sale price, I tell them to just make up a reasonable sale price using the fundamentals as your guiding denominator. Usually, they are within range and the Insurance does not dispute and pay the claim.

In the policy form, it is up to the Artist to prove what the value of sales, so if they put an unrealistic sale price on the work, the insurance company using similar methods will determine the sale price is way over inflated.  At this juncture, an independent third party will then appraise the work and the valuation will be established, and the claim would be paid out accordingly.

Bottom line, price your work based on the merits of your talent and experience with keeping the ego in check.

New Artist Insurance Program custom designed for the serious Artist.

 

Limits start at $100,000

 

  • Exhibition
  • Transit,
  • Studio
  • Storage
  • Worldwide Coverage
  • Includes Material and commissioned work in progress
  • Visit artinsurancenow.com for all your Art insurance

 

Premiums start at $1000

 

Kindly help me get the word out by passing this along

 

Thank You

 

William

William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
T. 212 566-1881 ext 111
F. 212 566-1615
C. 917 863-8787
wfleischer@bfbond.com
www.BFbond.com
www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

Artist who Exhibits… Read further.

artists-expenses

I have been working with many artists who have opportunities to exhibit in venues where the venue only offers the space but not the Insurance for the Art installed.

Many times as I interview these Artists, I find out the Artwork limits requested and the time period required will trigger the policy minimum premium of $1,000.

Being that I care about artists and the expenses they go through I explain for the same cost, Insurance is available to cover Artwork in the studio, in storage, while in transit and while the Art is at exhibitions.

Call me at 1.800.921.1008 to find out how you can protect your artwork or fill out the artist application here at www.artinsurancenow.com

William G. Fleischer CIC

Bernard Fleischer & Sons

 

Artists can insure their own work

For the past few weeks, I have written Fine Art policies for Painters, sculptures, and photographers.  The coverage is broad enough where the Art is covered in Transit, at the Gallery or Venue, and most important while it is in the studio.

The value of the art is based on the selling price minus 30%than the sale price. If the piece is sold. There is one catch, for the work to be covered, it must be for sale.  Living with an artist, I know everything in the studio is for sale, the question is at what price.

Which brings me to another determination.  The sale price is based on previous sales, just to keep the numbers real in an event of a loss.

Download the application here Artist’s fine art Insurance