Tag Archives: Art policy Coverages

Art Exhibition Insurance – The Details

As representatives of the top Insurance carriers that insure exhibitions locally, in multi-states and internationally, we know coverages.

Each company has their own distinct forms to insure the unique exposures related to exhibitions. Coverages while in transit, at the exhibition venue, and in storage vary by company.

Below are some highlighted coverages to consider when placing insurance for an exhibition, how to protect the lenders, and what is the right valuation method.

 

About Exhibition Coverage

Most Art Insurance policies not only insure the work on exhibition, but also the didactic and ancillary materials such as vitrines, hardware, technology, and supportive structures.

A typical Policy I use with my insureds exhibition policy includes:

  • Agreed Value: We usually require a schedule prior to binding, but different terms can be negotiated.
  • Worldwide coverage for transit: is important when gathering works from overseas collectors.
  • Named Location: some policy covers only named location and excludes transit
  • Scheduled or Blanket: 
    • The schedule:  Establishes the price of the work to be insured.
    • Blanket: policy usually has a per item cap along with the onus of proof of value is on the insured.
  •  Loss Payee Certificates: These are issued if a lender requires proof of coverage and insures the check will be made to them in case of a loss.

 

  • Additional Important Exhibition Coverages one should verify if covered:
    • Packing crates, catalogs, and brochures included
    • Nail to Nail coverage:Coverage from point of pick up until returned.
    • Goods in transit
    • Art in storage in-between transit

 

  • Broad, all-risk coverage
  • Blanket limits on propertyin your care, custody, and control at scheduled locations and any other unnamed locations. Beware of sub-limits.
  • Domestic and international transit: To/from list of Exhibition Locations
  • No coinsurance clause penalty
  • Valuation clauses: important to know how a loss will be settled. Our policies are designed for the art industry
  • Coverage for jointly-ownedworks of art should be disclosed and understood how a loss will be paid in those instances.
  • Special clauses for “loss buy back” or “pairs and sets”
  • Relaxed appraisal requirements with most companies
  • Based on Consignment value established at time of pick up.

 

About Exhibition Exclusions and Conditions:

These policy forms usually include the standard and not so standard Exhibition polices.

Wear and tear, moth, vermin, and insects.

Damage resulting from any repair, restoration, or retouching process.

Nuclear, radiation, biological or chemical contamination.

War, invasion, an act of foreign enemies, hostilities, military or usurped power.

Confiscated, damaged or destroyed by or order of any government or public or local authority, except if taken at the time of a fire to prevent it’s spread.

In Conclusion: Art insurance has many variables and sections which can be negotiated, if you are a knowledgeable Art Insurance broker.

Could buying art make you rich?

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

For one investor that dream came true. The painting ‘Salvator Mundi’ believed to be painted by Leonardo da Vinci purchased for £45 just sold for $450 million. So, is investing in art a good way to get rich quick? And how should you proceed? “with extreme caution” say financial advisors.

While stories like the recent Leonardo da Vinci sale and endless Antiques Roadshow episodes make it seem very attractive to invest in paintings and objets d’art, such cases are relatively rare. What you get back is based on supply and demand and there are big movements upwards or downwards if particular works or artists come in or out of fashion.

Attending a neighborhood garage sale or popping into a local thrift store can leave a lot to be desired. After sifting through dented furniture, chipped ceramics, and strange art, one is often left feeling that the presented merchandise is worthless. But if you are lucky enough, you may just find a diamond in the rough.

Some Top Garage Sale Finds:

  • $3 for a Ceramic Bowl, Sold at Auction for $2.2 million
  • Andy Warhol Sketch Purchased for $5, Valued at $2 Million
  • 50 Cents for a Painting worth $10,000
  • Tiffany Mirror Purchased for $2, Valued at $25,000

 

Photo of Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)
Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)

The high sale price of the Leonardo painting was not typical, a recent academic study, based on examining data from 1.2 million auction house sales of paintings, drawings and prints, concluded that art appreciated in value by a modest 3.97% per year, in real US dollar terms, between 1957 and 2007.

Given the current environment of low interest rates, that’s still a better return than many savings accounts will give you. Paintings are seen as attractive investments because it’s very clear what you’re buying. Part of this is driven by investors’ desire for “real assets”.

Many investors lost money in the financial crisis by investing in products they did not understand, they are turning back to things such as art. Wealthy clients spend an increasing part of their wealth on art and collectibles.

You don’t necessarily have to be super-wealthy to invest in art.

Affordable Art Fair photoThe ArtInsuranceNow.com sponsored 2017 Spring Affordable Art Fair was an excellent example of great works of art that are accessible.  There are a growing number of art fairs and online marketplaces such as Artfinder aimed at buyers with a more modest budget.

The Affordable Art Fair (AAF), which started out in London’s Battersea Park in 1999, now holds fairs in more than 10 cities around the world. But while it may be becoming more affordable, just don’t bet on becoming a millionaire yourself.

With a keen eye and a lot of luck you may come across a valuable find but most art industry experts suggest that you buy a piece of art because you like it, not because you want to get rich. “If it goes up in value that should be just an added bonus.”

Protect your valued finds by visiting us at ArtInsuranceNow.com, voted a 2017 Top Broker and listed as the “Cream of the crop” in our respective area of Art Insurance by Insurance Business Magazine. We can help with all Art related insurance requirements. Apply here or Contact William Fleischer CIC at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.

Art Insurance for Collectors; Schedule vs. Blanket

The Art of Collecting Art.

There’s a big difference between buying art and collecting art. Buying art is more of a random activity based on likes, preferences or attractions at any given moment while collecting art is more of a purposeful directed long-term commitment. An important step in good collecting is not the most delightful one to talk about, but it is among the most necessary, and that is to plan for the unforeseen.

As an art insurance broker, I readily come across collections that are an intricate part of retirement and inheritance planning.  It’s a great asset to pass down.  Baby boomers bought artwork for the love of the art.  Art as an investment vehicle was a small part of the decision-making, not like today which is the main focus.

In the past 15 years as the art market sales and demand took off, Art purchased 40, 30 or even 10 years ago is worth a lot.  Hence, I am seeing collector’s policy limits rise into the millions. I will explain some key differences in the type of policy offered in today’s marketplace. Art Insurance and collectible insurance demands are a new focus with some insurers. Beware, like the art world, no two are the same, read the exclusions, conditions and valuation clauses in a policy.

Understand what schedule means and its limitations, some say the maximum they will pay is what is on the schedule or schedule plus 125% or 150% and then some added or market value whichever is less.  A popular coverage is Blanket Insurance; usually, this is for the collection under $300,000. The advantage is that you are not required to supply the companies with appraisals, bill of sale or any other documentation when you bind the coverage.

Only at the time of loss, the onus of proof of value is on the collector.  This is not a lengthy process; either go back to your paperwork and ask for a current valuation from a dealer or show your work to a dealer and put the value in a letter. Both methods of either scheduling the art or using the blanket limit are tools I use when working with my clients.  Each person looks at insurance in different ways and has different requirements. Let me work with you and answer all your questions to present a program which is satisfactory to all those involved.

Visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com to apply or Contact me at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.

William G. Fleischer CIC

Consignment Options

I was chatting with a Art Dealer and we were reviewing A proposal for her business. As we went through the quote, she had a question regarding Consignments.
Interesting, as a dealer, the usually business model is to receive work on consignment, but what happens when you consign works to other dealers. How is the coverage applied.

So I pulled out policy forms and started to read through them. This is what I found under Valuation.

Property on consignment, at agreed consignment value plus 10%

So My question to the underwriters, is the valuation used for any consignment agreement whether if the deal is the consignee or the consignor.

In one underwriters opinion, he wrote to me this

Since this is a dealer form, the consignment refers to property on consignment to the Insured as the dealer.  This way the owner of the property is made whole, and the dealer gets 10% for administrative and marketing expenses they have incurred.”

but the underwriter failed to clarify works on consignment to other dealers.

 

Property sold but not delivered and/or while in transit to consignee’s or owner’s premises shall be valued at the selling price plus expenses, if any, which have accrued from the date of sale

So now my question is while in transit to consignee, if not sold, how is it valued, based on what i read, it would be selling price plus expense,. You would think the company would argue the dealer valuation of  cost plus 20% or 30%  or selling price less 20% or 30% depending what negotiated with the from Insurance company).

To further complicate the issue, another company responded a a simple way. A Consignment is a consignment no matter to the dealer or among dealers.

So in conclusion I must use that famous insurance answer to almost all questions of coverage; “maybe, depends”

This is why I love the Insurance business exploring the grey areas in policies.

Visit my main website page here

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance New Program
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Corporate Collections
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability

BERNARD FLEISCHER & SONS, INC.

29 Broadway, Suite 1511, New York, NY 10006-3201
(212) 566-1881 ext 111 or (800) 921-1008

 

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