Tag Archives: Artist Insurance

Glass Artist Loses ‘Every Single Piece’ in Napa Valley wildfire; Our Exclusive Artist’s Insurance Policy Pays Off.

Napa Valley is typically a peaceful, relaxing place but not for Glass artist Clifford Rainey who lost his home, his studio and most of his work in the Atlas wildfire. The wildfires Fueled by powerful winds have scorched more than 200,000 acres including the beautiful homes of artists and collectors.

 

On Friday morning, Oct. 13, as Rainey surveyed the damage for the first time after his Mount George home and studio burned, said “Every single piece of artwork I own I’ve had since college was lost”.

 

Rainey’s life’s work is far from all lost. His work has exhibited extensively, featured in numerous public collections, including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York, the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, as well as in the permanent collections of the Museum of Arts & Design, New York, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

 

The emotional value cannot be replaced but having an artist’s policy to cover financial losses prevents having to start from zero. Our Artist Insurance Policy is designed for the active Artist. Your Art is covered while in the Studio, in Transit, while at Exhibitions and when in storage along with Your Materials, tools and reference library.  No more worrying about, Theft, Fire, Water Damage or Vandalism. These coverages and more are covered in our Artist Insurance Policies.

 

For more information or to discuss your particular situation contact me, William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal.  T: 212 566-1881 ext.111 or visit us at www.artinsurancenow.com to fill out a quick EZ application for a fast, free quote.

Artist’s Nightmare at the Museum

Museum in the dark pictureJust imagine, you are an artist without an Artist Insurance Policy and you finally get an exciting call from a museum to tell you that they have chosen your work for an exhibition for several months.  You work extremely hard on creating the exhibit and receive a contract from the museum that says they will insure your artwork while it is on display. A friend from out of town visits and you take them to see the exhibit and notice your prized sculpture in the exhibit is damaged. Immediately, you contact the museum and call for a plan of action; you ask to see the security footage and request more information about submitting the insurance claim. The museum seems uncooperative, explains to you the security cameras aren’t operating, there isn’t any evidence to support your claim the sculpture was damaged while on display and there is no insurance information they can provide for you at this time. You continue to push for an insurance claim, the museum continues to be evasive and you feel like you are getting nowhere. It looks as though the museum is not going to submit a claim on your behalf and the repairs will cost an enormous amount of money and numerous hours of your time.

This is a real-life insurance horror story from cases that the Philadelphia Volunteer Lawyers for the arts (PVLA) have heard over the years. Unsurprisingly, insurance disputes are a common occurrence with PVLA arts clients. The underinsurance of artwork presents artists with various problems which are much more commonly associated with their profession than others. Another unique problem with the underinsurance of artwork is with its valuation. Artwork is often not treated with the same financial diligence as other assets because it can be difficult to place a value on it and can cover a broad range of items including paintings, sculpture, architecture, printmaking, digital graphics, ceramics, collage, photography, statuary, textiles, art glass and other decorative items.

Insuring fine art presents challenges that are not encountered with other types of real property; an experienced art insurance broker like Bernard Fleischer & Sons (ArtInsuranceNow.com) can address these problems and provide an art insurance policy with coverage fitting the particular situation. Our artist insurance policy values your art at market value less a percentage. The policy covers your art anywhere in the world, while at exhibitions, galleries, storage and in the studio including transit, materials and tools. Art insurance buyers require the services of knowledgeable insurance professionals because “It’s a different type of insurance”. With most insurance you are just buying a financial promise, any insurer knows how to fix a roof or rebuild a building but with art insurance you are buying knowledge as well. Bernard Fleischer & Sons (ArtInsuranceNow.com) are leaders in appropriately insuring artists, art dealers, collectors, conservators, galleries and museums. For more information visit our website, call 1.800.921.1008 or fill out an application here.

Iconic Muhammad Ali print stolen from museum.

The Print, which was stolen while the museum was open to the public depicted Ali in a classic boxing pose painted in the brilliantly colored, expressionist style that LeRoy Neiman was known for. Brazen thieves ripped the print from the wall even with security cameras watching, It’s important to understand the value of art insurance and protect yourself by covering your valuable collection.

Although risk extends beyond theft (47 percent of art loss is attributed to damage during transit according to The New York Times) art trafficking is a very real thing and according to statistics ranks third behind drugs and arms.

In a case of  theft, the loss is irreversible. Not only the artwork is irreplaceable itself but also even the reputation of the organization suffers from a mere fact that such situation has occurred. Without having a comprehensive fine art collectors insurance from a trustworthy art insurance broker, the masterpieces are subjected to risk.

Apply for coverage here or call me if you have any questions or to discuss your options.

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

 

How to evaluate your own work as an artist

Since my Launch of an Artist’s Insurance website: I have had numerous conversations regarding “How an Insurance Company evaluates Art.”

The policy evaluation is straightforward. Sales price minus 30%.

This is a simple formula if you have a track record of sales.  Where the conversation turns, is when the artist is new to the market.  I say this because I have worked with artists who, at various ages and experience are now, entering group shows and exhibitions.

A seasoned artist knows the consignment agreement or the exhibition agreement requires the artist to place a value of their Artwork in the form, but for the neophyte, this is where the “tire hits the Road” or the “paint hits the canvas” and takes the discussion deeper.

So what are the methods of pricing one’s own work, and will the insurance company accept the sale price of an artist, who never sold?

This is how I approach the question.

First, everything has a value.  Fundamentally;  material, time, education, experience, teachers, demographics, size shape, media, subject, along with time spent, researching and actually producing the work. etc…

Of course, the Artist understands this, but what is the valuation sale price, I tell them to just make up a reasonable sale price using the fundamentals as your guiding denominator. Usually, they are within range and the Insurance does not dispute and pay the claim.

In the policy form, it is up to the Artist to prove what the value of sales, so if they put an unrealistic sale price on the work, the insurance company using similar methods will determine the sale price is way over inflated.  At this juncture, an independent third party will then appraise the work and the valuation will be established, and the claim would be paid out accordingly.

Bottom line, price your work based on the merits of your talent and experience with keeping the ego in check.

New Artist Insurance Program custom designed for the serious Artist.

 

Limits start at $100,000

 

  • Exhibition
  • Transit,
  • Studio
  • Storage
  • Worldwide Coverage
  • Includes Material and commissioned work in progress
  • Visit artinsurancenow.com for all your Art insurance

 

Premiums start at $1000

 

Kindly help me get the word out by passing this along

 

Thank You

 

William

William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
T. 212 566-1881 ext 111
F. 212 566-1615
C. 917 863-8787
wfleischer@bfbond.com
www.BFbond.com
www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

Exhibition Policy or not?

Email regarding having Artist shows in an Office Environment.

I am an attorney, however, I put an art gallery in my law firm space. The agreement I have with the artists is that they allow me to hang their work for 3 to 4 weeks. I promote their work to my clients and throw a party in the artist’s honor, where the artists agree to be present and talk about art.

We serve some refreshments and invite everyone we see. There is no charge to the artist. I do not pay the artists. I do not sell art. There is no charge to the people who attend. It is a community event intended to bring a little culture to our small town and, admittedly, let people know where my office is without in-your-face law office marketing.

The rules in Iowa are the strictest in the country about regulating attorney advertising. I cannot hand someone a business card and say, “hi. I’m a lawyer. What can I do for you?” But, I can hand someone a party invitation flyer and say, “Hi, please come to my law firm’s gallery party and meet some cool artists, see some great art, listen to some inspiring music, and have a little wine and yummy appetizers. It’s so much fun!” I know. Crazy stupid.

When the party is over, the artists take their work away and three or four new artists bring in work to hang, and we do it all over again. My 4th party is November 14, 2014.

The artists for this party are asking if I have insurance to cover the art in the case of fire, vandalism, or theft. My insurance guy is not helpful. He says I have no insurable interest, so I cannot insure them with the exception that if I trip over them, my liability insurance might cover it. Lame.

The artist could sue me if something were to happen to their paintings while in my control. I do have an insurable interest, at least while they are in my custody and control.

Can you assist me in finding a way to obtain insurance or a bond of some type that will protect me in the case that something unthinkable would happen to these paintings?

Thank you,
Warmest regards,

The Answer… or my Answer.

When I further inquired I found the Artist work was hung without any paperwork. Interesting.

1. If the work was Loan during the show to the office, it may be covered under the office BOP policy, usually, there is $25,000 limit for Fine Art.

2. A dealer art insurance policy could be bought, for $150,000 on location limit, $30,000 Art Transit and $30,000 at unnamed locations.

3. Have the Artist buy their own Artist Insurance policy. $100,000 of Art Insurance while in transit, in the studio and while at Exhibitions for an annual price of $1,000.00.

4. Explain to the Artist,  it’s a business risk and art is a risky business.  The odds are higher of damaged or stolen while in transit, and less than their work in the studio, at lease your office is alarmed or locked 🙂

She explained to me even though a hold harmless could be drawn up and signed, there was still the exposure of a negligence lawsuit by the artist. So here is the question to ponder, buy insurance and not worry or understand it is a business risk you are taking verse the benefit of letting the people know your law office exists.

 

 

Artist who Exhibits… Read further.

artists-expenses

I have been working with many artists who have opportunities to exhibit in venues where the venue only offers the space but not the Insurance for the Art installed.

Many times as I interview these Artists, I find out the Artwork limits requested and the time period required will trigger the policy minimum premium of $1,000.

Being that I care about artists and the expenses they go through I explain for the same cost, Insurance is available to cover Artwork in the studio, in storage, while in transit and while the Art is at exhibitions.

Call me at 1.800.921.1008 to find out how you can protect your artwork or fill out the artist application here at www.artinsurancenow.com

William G. Fleischer CIC

Bernard Fleischer & Sons

 

Artists can insure their own work

For the past few weeks, I have written Fine Art policies for Painters, sculptures, and photographers.  The coverage is broad enough where the Art is covered in Transit, at the Gallery or Venue, and most important while it is in the studio.

The value of the art is based on the selling price minus 30%than the sale price. If the piece is sold. There is one catch, for the work to be covered, it must be for sale.  Living with an artist, I know everything in the studio is for sale, the question is at what price.

Which brings me to another determination.  The sale price is based on previous sales, just to keep the numbers real in an event of a loss.

Download the application here Artist’s fine art Insurance