Category Archives: Private Collectors and Corporate Collections

Artwork in Transit; Managing the Risks

The top risks art collectors might face surprisingly doesn’t include theft. In fact, its art that’s on the move that poses the biggest risk. A large proportion of art claims are derived from transit losses. Private collectors enjoy lending, particularly as exhibitions in major institutions can increase value, that’s all very well until something goes wrong.

The movement of art is massive, now art is transported coast to coast, internationally or just to your winter home or local Gallery. When handling artwork, packing for transportation is a top concern for insurance carriers.

Many policies list as a condition, professional packing, meaning it must be packed as someone in the industry would pack it, safe, secure and protective from breaking if possible.

If you use a transportation service, either a fine art mover, a local mover, or common carrier, you must verify if they have or offer Insurance, what are their limits, conditions and the cost of the coverage. Insurance carriers differ and may have restrictions or limitations while your valuables are on the road, on a ship, or in air transit. The most common, efficient and safe way of moving art over long distances, domestically or internationally is by air transport, but it is very common to move the work yourself, so make sure your policy covers self-conveyance.

Some art transporting choices such as those offered by, United Parcel Service (UPS), DHL, Federal Express (FedEx), and other private art handling companies or commercial air freight carriers have limitations on coverages, territory, and deductibles. Keep in mind that while these are services used for fragile and non-fragile fine art, things happen within their control and outside of their control. Looking to your own insurance policy for protection is the right way to limit your financial losses and the quickest way to have the claim settled.

Artists, art dealers, and institutions use these Art transport services regularly, but Insurance, in particular, is the gray area in which most misunderstandings occur. Pay close attention to the bill of lading and understanding the fine print. The standard form limits the exposure of a claim on the art to weight, not value.

Our policies are written either as a schedule or market value less a percentage. Either way, your art will be protected while in transport. Caution, it’s important when securing transit art insurance to add extra days of transport for the unknown delays. Also note the declared value placed in customs forms or the bill of Lading is usually not used when settling a claim but look for wording which would specify to the contrary.

According to FedEx, “shipments (packages or freight) containing all or part of the following items are limited to a maximum declared value of $500: Artwork, including any work created or developed by the application of skill, taste or creative talent for sale, display or collection.

This includes, but is not limited to, items (and their parts) such as paintings, drawings, vases, tapestries, limited-edition prints, fine art, statuary, sculpture, collectors’ items, customized or personalized musical instruments, Film, photographic images, including photographic negatives, photographic chromes and photographic slides.

Any commodity that by its inherent nature is particularly susceptible to damage, or the market value of which is particularly variable or difficult to ascertain.”

According to UPS, articles of “unusual value” are prohibited from being offered for shipment. This definition explicitly includes “works of art.” As the November New York-based auctions ended and Art Basel Miami Beach began, for collectors buying and selling art no doubt demanded lots of their attention, they also should be thinking about keeping their art safe and properly insured as it moves between locations.

With the expansion of the global art market, risks increase. To discover a larger number of buyers, auction houses and art dealers often display art at multiple locations, including a growing number of art fairs around the world like Art Basel. The high volume of art exchanging hands increases the risk of improper handling and accidental damage and therefore increases the number of fine art insurance claims.

You should know where your art will be stored while in the possession of art dealers or auction houses. This is critical. For example, many consigned works were stored in art gallery basements in Chelsea during Hurricane Sandy, leaving many damaged. Art galleries may also store artwork at an off-site storage facility. Being notified before your piece is moved from one location to another is also a precaution and obtaining confirmation on how it will be packed and transported will help to ensure a smooth consignment process.

Don’t presume that the auction house, gallery owner, art dealer, or shipping company with possession of your artwork has insurance for its loss, theft or damage. It’s very important to have your own fine art policy. Collectors should always consult with an insurance agent. The agent can tailor a policy to a specific collector and discover any special provisions in the collector’s fine art policy.
No matter what risks they face, creating an insurance policy for an art collector requires one-on-one consultation since every art collection is unique, no two collectors are alike and no two collections are alike.

Collectors and their advisers would be wise to work with knowledgeable insurance brokers like Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc.  that can guide you in obtaining the right fine art insurance for your unique requirements. For more info visit www.artinsurancenow.com and live chat with us or call us at 800.921.1008

Art Insurance for Collectors; Schedule vs. Blanket

The Art of Collecting Art.

There’s a big difference between buying art and collecting art. Buying art is more of a random activity based on likes, preferences or attractions at any given moment while collecting art is more of a purposeful directed long-term commitment. An important step in good collecting is not the most delightful one to talk about, but it is among the most necessary, and that is to plan for the unforeseen.

As an art insurance broker, I readily come across collections that are an intricate part of retirement and inheritance planning.  It’s a great asset to pass down.  Baby boomers bought artwork for the love of the art.  Art as an investment vehicle was a small part of the decision-making, not like today which is the main focus.

In the past 15 years as the art market sales and demand took off, Art purchased 40, 30 or even 10 years ago is worth a lot.  Hence, I am seeing collector’s policy limits rise into the millions. I will explain some key differences in the type of policy offered in today’s marketplace. Art Insurance and collectible insurance demands are a new focus with some insurers. Beware, like the art world, no two are the same, read the exclusions, conditions and valuation clauses in a policy.

Understand what schedule means and its limitations, some say the maximum they will pay is what is on the schedule or schedule plus 125% or 150% and then some added or market value whichever is less.  A popular coverage is Blanket Insurance; usually, this is for the collection under $300,000. The advantage is that you are not required to supply the companies with appraisals, bill of sale or any other documentation when you bind the coverage.

Only at the time of loss, the onus of proof of value is on the collector.  This is not a lengthy process; either go back to your paperwork and ask for a current valuation from a dealer or show your work to a dealer and put the value in a letter. Both methods of either scheduling the art or using the blanket limit are tools I use when working with my clients.  Each person looks at insurance in different ways and has different requirements. Let me work with you and answer all your questions to present a program which is satisfactory to all those involved.

Visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com to apply or Contact me at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.

William G. Fleischer CIC

As Art Basel Miami 2016 approaches, we look at the necessity of a good art insurance policy.

artbasel-miami-beachArt Basel, the international art fair with three shows staged annually in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. The shows offer parallel programming produced in collaboration with the host city’s local institutions. Art Basel provides a platform for galleries to show and sell their work to collectors, museum directors and curators. The 2015 show in Miami presented 267 leading international galleries from 32 countries. Over five days the show attracted 77,000 visitors including private collectors and directors, curators, trustees and patrons of nearly 200 museum and institution groups. The show hosted first-time collectors from Cambodia, Ethiopia, Nicaragua, Romania, Togo and Zimbabwe. That’s a lot of art moving around and collectors Art policies should cover Art, when purchased, on consignment and in transit, it’s about knowing your coverage situation before it’s too late.

art-basel-miamiThe transportation of art is a tricky thing, and as fine art transportation insurance leaders we can tell you exactly what you require to know so that your insurance program will be effective and  cover you properly.  Insurance coverage during transportation, installation and exhibition of irreplaceable works of art, antiquities, and memorabilia isn’t optional and the best way to obtain the finest coverage is to visit artinsurancenow.com or call us at 800.921.1008 to speak with a knowledgeable fine art broker that can advocate for you in seeking the best possible insurance terms.

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AXA Art Insurance Company

 
Good News! After 29 years in the Insurance Business, I have partnered up with   AXA and Travelers Insurance Company. We can now negotiate favorable terms and conditions with very competitive pricing. I now have the facility to insure all types and size collections, Dealers, Museums and Non-profit galleries.
If you are involved in the art world, I can insure your exposures.

• Commercial Art • Art and Antique Dealers • Restore and Conservators • Museums • Private collectors • Large or Small inventories. • Domestic or International. • Art Fair transportation, while at fair,     shipped to collectors • Art loaned to Museums or non- profits, • Art being shipped or carried on board, • Coverage for special events, Parties,     Gala’s, Dinners. • Non-profit organizations and more

There are special policies so broad that besides the standard theft or breakage coverage’s it actually includes mold and devaluation of the art pieces due to a loss. The premiums begin around $2,500 for about $250,000 worth of protection.

Recent successes:  An Art dealer who brings works to various fairs and sells from her private gallery just purchased this policy

$300,000 premises limit $300,000 unnamed location $300,000 while in transit We set the unnamed location limit and transit limit as matching limits to avoid any gaps in coverage. Premium is $3100 with $1,000 deductible.

The Genuine Article“Total flexibility with market-leading security – the ultimate high-net-worth coverage for art and antique collectibles, buildings, and contents.”
Call me with your questions.

William G. Fleischer, CIC 212 566-1881 ext 111 wfleischer@bfbond.com

Dealer Insurance, Museum Insurance, Corporate/Private Fine Art, and Collectibles Insurance.

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Insuring Art Work at Market Value

Collecting Art is fun, but maintaining values fluctuate a lot on an insurance policy.  All homeowners policies where fine art is a part of the policy are written on a scheduled basis.

To add these artworks to your schedule, the company requires a current bill of sale or a current appraisal.  The value is locked based on the schedule, good if the value goes down, bad if the values goes up.

Here is an endorsement which I feel the collector should consider when they are insuring an art collection.

It’s the Current Market Value 150.  With this endorsement, the company will pay the amount shown on the Schedule for which the item is insured. However, if the market value of the itemized article immediately before the loss or damage exceeds the amount of itemized coverage for that article, we will pay its “current market value” immediately before the loss or damage up to 150% of the amount of the itemized coverage for that article. Of course, if the item market value decrease you will get less.

For a quote on Fine Art, Collectibles and objects of value click here for the collectors application on my website.

 

 

Use UCC filings when you Cosign your Art to a Dealer.

Recently, while I was discussing art with an attorney, UCC filings came up.   Usually, this is filed when you take out a business or personal loans and the lender to protect its collateral files the UCC with the state.

It’s an inexpensive file, which is used to notify the state you are a lender and have claim to the object corresponding to the UCC.

So I always tell everyone when you lend for sale your Art, to always have an expiration of consignment, in case the other party gets in financial difficulties the asset reverts to you at the end of the consignment date.

But now adding the UCC you attach yourself to the asset so any court can recognize you are in line to be paid if the art is sold.

An interesting layer of protection from an unstable partnership.

 

William

www.artinsurancenow.com

Insure fading photographs

Photographs have complex chemical structure and material composition. Each material has its own preservation issues and needs.

Consequently, photographs may suffer from fading and deterioration over time regardless of the extra care and special handling. Most Insurance Companies cannot provide coverage for items that cause themselves to deteriorate as a cause of loss.

However, a proper appraisal done every 3-5 years will keep the collection in good proper order. As changes in condition occur, a current appraisal will note the photograph’s individual characteristics which will then influence the current market value of the single item.

Contact:  William Fleischer 800-921-1008 or visit my website for application

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance New Program
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Corporate Collections
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability

Art Evaluation formulas you might see in an Art Collection Policy

Here are most of the current options found in an Art Collectors Insurance policy

1. Stated Amount based on an appraisal.
2. Market value or appraised value whichever is less.
3. Market value or appraised value. Maximum value 1.5% of appraisal value.
4. Market value – Onus of proof ( insured to prove value) up to policy limit.
5. Unscheduled Items: can be based on maximum value per item –Maximum Blanket limit- Onus of proof for valuation
6. Newly Acquired Property their cash value, but not more than 25% on similar type of policy.
7. Newly Acquired Property the lesser of 25% on similar type on policy or $10,000.
8. The cost of reasonably restoring that property to it condition immediately before the loss
9. The cost of replacing that property with a substantially identical property.
10. Property of Others in your Care, Custody, and control Maximum, based on the agreed amount prior to Loss 25% of Policy Limit,
11. Jointly Owned Property, value as stated in an agreement with the co-owner(s) up to the amount of your interest.
12. A loss to your Art Reference library, including books, catalogs and “data and Media” Settled at Actual Cash Value.

William
William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
212 566-1881 ext 111
wfleischer@bfbond.com
www.BFbond.com
www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance New Program
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Corporate Collections
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability

How to Insure Prehistoric Art properly.

Prehistoric Art is Art from Ancient Near East, Ancient Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Islamic Art, etc was created on many different types of Median, Ceramic, Gold, Silver, Tapestry, Bronze, wood, stone. etc. over the years these work of art have become scarce, fragile and valuable.

I am insuring a dealer in Indian Art who specializes in Prehistoric Art.  He reminded me that Long Island in NY had one of the largest concentrations of Arrowheads.

Addressing the Insurance coverage for those Art items which you care for, I have a very special understanding of the risk of damage, theft while in the home or in a Exhibitions.

Art Insurance policies are not all the same. Some are written through LLOYD S of London, AXA Art, Travelers Insurance Company to name a few players.  The Art Insurance company will include Transit by Sea, Air & Land. Coverage is usually extended to a Storage facility or the final destination.

To have these items insured, the underwriters in most cases will require a condition report if in long-term storage or if newly purchased, a bill of sale or appraisal.
Visit ArtinsuranceNow.com to complete the Collectors application to cover your prehistoric, Modern and contemporary art.

William

art insuranceart insurance  art insurance

 

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance New Program
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Corporate Collections
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability

What is Conversion exclusion in a fine art, Antique, Jewelry policy

The Story;

A collector or Museum consigns a work to a dealer to sell.  The dealer does his job and sells the work, but does not pay the Collector or Museum.  This is now considered a loss of property and if your current policy does not address this type of loss you may not have coverage.

Now if the consignment date has expired and the dealer is not willing to return the work, in many incidences this would be classified as theft and be covered by your fine arts policy.

For more information on Conversion Exclusion call us at 1.800.921.1008, visit our website at www.ArtInsuranceNow.com or fill out one of the applications below for a fast and easy quote.

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability