Category Archives: Fine Art

6 Tips for Hanging Wall Art in Your Home

One of the easiest ways to make your home feel more welcoming and comfortable is to add some wall art. Even a couple of pieces can make the whole room look surprisingly homier. But, if you want to incorporate art into your home properly, you need to keep in mind a couple of things. So, to help you out, we will cover the six most important tips for hanging wall art in your home.

Hanging wall art in your home – what to keep in mind

You should consider the following tips as helpful guidelines for hanging wall art in your home. By no means should you regard these tips as rules set in stone. After all, the whole point of having art is to be creative and to feel the freedom to express yourself.

It is important to mention, though, that these tips are based on tried and true interior designers’ methods. So, while you don’t have to follow our tips, at least have them in mind when you decorate your home next time.

Keep artwork at eye level

The first and easiest tip is to keep your art at eye level. The whole point of incorporating art into your home is for you and the people close to you to look at it. And the last thing you need is to strain your neck in order to see the art well. 

If you cannot position all of your pieces at a height approximately the same as your eyes, try to pick the most presentable ones. Know that people’s attention will naturally go to the work of art they can look at directly. So, use the one piece that is most deserving of such attention.

Follow the shape of the wall

The impression you want to make is that a piece of art looks as if it has been made for the wall it is hanging on. To achieve this, you should take into account the shape and size of the wall. A large, square wall is perfectly suited for one large picture or a panel of multiple smaller ones. A wall that is taller than it is wide should take paintings of the same shape. Ideally, you should always follow the form of the wall. Alternatively, you can use smaller, square-shaped pictures and arrange them to suit the shape of the wall.

Consider the room color

One of the more important tips to keep in mind is that your art pieces aren’t isolated. If you are to situate them in your home adequately, you need to take a close look at the room you want to place them. Your art should flow naturally with your room. It means that it mustn’t clash with the color so that it becomes uncomfortable to look at. Conversely, it shouldn’t blend in so much that it is practically invisible. The goal here is to find the golden mean.

Your art should be attractive so that people notice it when they enter the room. If the space has a certain feel to it, your art should be in accordance with it, enhancing the vibe of the place. This is usually not something that you can figure out immediately, which is why you should experiment until you find the right piece.

Pick proper frames

Arguably, frames are the most overlooked aspect of wall art. People often consider them unimportant as they serve to protect the picture. And while having sturdy frames will help professionals handle such valuable items, if you need to move them, you need to think beyond mere safety when you are incorporating art into your home. After all, in case of a relocation, you will hire professionals to handle your art for you precisely for safety reasons.

So, keep in mind that frames play a significant role in how people perceive your art and its place in your home. Ideally, you should use the same material for your frame as the furniture in your home. If you have wooden furniture, use wooden frames in the same or similar color. If you have metal or plastic details, use metal or plastic frames. Having the right frame will help your art feel more like a part of the whole room and not make it stick out.

Choose wall art that matters

A common mistake that people make is that they place art in their homes solely for the sake of having it. While having art in your home is better than not having it at all, you shouldn’t focus on the mere looks of it. Every piece is an idea or emotion that the artist has incorporated into canvas. Therefore, you should do your best to find art that speaks to you.

A good work of art will cause you to pause while looking at it and experience something. The less you can put into words the precise feeling you are experiencing, the more you should work towards incorporating that piece into your home. After all, art is supposed to be about getting to know ourselves and our inner thoughts and emotions, not making our environment look nicer (although it is an important aspect of it). It would be even better to incorporate an interesting comic art in place of a boring painting that nobody cares about. The person who understands this will value your home much more when they witness such art. Value quality more than quantity, and look for the meaning in your artwork rather than its appearance.  

Avoid kitsch art

The final tip for hanging wall art in your home is to avoid kitsch. Here we play into the previous advice regarding using art that matters. Yes, it would help if you had art that makes you feel good, but try to avoid blindly following trends. A good aesthete knows a bit about art history and will do their best to find pieces of art that work for their home, no matter whether they are trendy or not. And finally, if you find an expensive piece, consider contacting us and getting proper art insurance. In the long-run, you’ll be happy that you did.

Once your prized art is hung, make sure you have the proper coverage to protect it. Most homeowners insurance policies cover jewelry, art and collections the same as any other possession, subject to your policy’s deductible and coverage limits. For example, most homeowners policies limit coverage for possessions to up to 75% of your dwelling coverage.

So if you have a policy that provides $100,000 in coverage for your home, you’d also have no more than $75,000 in coverage for all of your possessions. And the policy may cover only the depreciated value of the items, not the replacement cost — and that can make a big difference with something like fine-art, which can appreciate with age.

Get your free quote from ArtInsuranceNow.com Trusted one stop insurance for the art community by clicking the link below.

Avoiding Online Art Fraud

The following are excerpts from our Principal William G. Fleischer’s Q&A interview with renowned online art site, Artsy.

Artsy features the world’s leading galleries, museum collections, foundations, artist estates, art fairs, and benefit auctions, all in one place.  William represents leading art insurers like: AXA, Travelers, Chubb, XL-Catlin, ARIS, Philadelphia, Tokyo Marine, Markel, Hartford, and Berkeley, just to name a few. He has been honored by Insurance Business Magazine as a top Fine-Art Insurance broker. 

1. How do you assess who is at fault in the case of online fraud?

It’s always the seller, and what does that mean? It means it could be an auction house, gallery, dealer, artist, or collector. It only takes one to commit fraud and fool the rest.

Anyone selling art or buying art has the exposure of fraud. Both parties must do their due diligence, such as verifying provenance, artist catalog raisonné, and authenticity certifications. If the art has an appraisal, then verify that it is not photoshop or touched up. To make sure one does all they can to confirm the authenticity, these are some resources: contacting the appraiser, establishing the comparisons, and researching the appraiser to avoid possibly buying or selling a fake.    

Some art dealers try to do a soft touch by requiring sellers/consignees to sign documents regarding titles, conditions, and appraisals to endorse that they are true. The more you inform yourself, the better; you can never do too much research or ask too many questions.  

When it comes to fraudulent art coverage, not all art policies cover fraudulent artwork; it is considered contraband, and selling contraband is illegal. If the work is scheduled for your collector’s policy and is found to be fake, there is no misrepresentation coverage. If you have a blanket policy, you will be paid for the fake market value. So buying and selling fake art is legal as long as you disclose it as a replica.

2. How have your policies adapted to cybersecurity breaches in the art market?

The traditional Art insurance policy has not adopted to cyber exposures. The insurance industry developed a special Cyber Liability Policy focusing on cyber-crime exposure. This policy pertains to identity theft, ransomware (when someone locks you out from your data, emails, network, etc.) extortion, stealing secrets passwords, defacing websites, and virus attacks. 

3. How recent is this sector in the field of insurance?

Cyber is about ten years old. With the proliferation of online business, there has been a growth of hackers, viruses, and extortionists. The increase has risen so significantly that our government has created requirements for firms to follow to protect consumers.

As for online fraud, it has been around since the time you could upload pictures to the web, and Adobe Photoshop was developed. This has caused many issues from wiring, bounced checks, and even sending empty boxes to purchasers.

4. How long has ArtInsuranceNow.com been involved in this aspect of insuring artworks? 

We have been insuring online art dealers for the past seven years. It has grown into a vertical marketplace. Everyone is selling online, including artists, collectors, auction houses, galleries, dealers, and even art stores.

Each has its own unique exposures to fraud. Keep in mind that not all policies are the same. Be sure to check if your policy addresses your requirements like online transit coverage, method of valuation at time of loss calculations, or covering your art inventory on and off the premises.

5. Do you see a greater need for this kind of protection in the industry?

For Cyber, yes. New York State has joined other states imposing a cyber law called “Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security.” (Shield) https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/new-york-shield-act.aspx this requirement enforces that all employers to have a plan preventing breaches to their computers, networks, and associated vendors accounts.

This is a forever ending battle between hackers and online transactions. As for the actual exchange of art, there have been talks of blockchains, but it’s too young of a concept and still unproven to be used as a standard in today’s art transactions. 

6. Can you provide some examples of cybersecurity cases you’ve had to handle? 

I have not handled any cyber claims directly, but I am aware of a few: 

A hacker was able to enter the data of a large firm. They then posted the information on a social media website for everyone to read. The leaked information included: what they purchased, addresses, the items they sent, family members, affairs, second homes, and other nonpublic notes in a client file.

This was a clear breach of confidential information. Although it was not their fault, the firm was sued because a spouse learned of an affair and asked for a divorce. Another lawsuit was served because a private loan against the art was shared, which tainted their reputation. All in all, this breach caused multiple cases.

Another case brought to my attention was a prominent online dealer who was hacked by ransomware (explained above). It was very costly to pay. They locked him and his staff out of their management system, websites, all email accounts, and their access to vendors.

The business was frozen until the ransom was paid. The dealer did have the option to rebuild his systems from scratch, but it would be time-consuming, and with these delicate matters, time is of the essence.

The last I will share case occurred with a museum. A director was out of town on business, a hacker got into her email and sent a request to wire money to the controller to purchase art work. Just like that, the transfer was done, and the Museum lost $30,000.

7. What should collectors keep an eye out for regarding insurance when collecting online?

For fraud, they should keep an eye out for: the reputation of seller and buyer, the person or company who does the appraisals, condition reports, how the art is packed, whether the items are on the government forbidden list (like ivory), and complaints. 

When it comes to cybersecurity, confirm: if there is a security in place, preventing attacks.If the second or third party provides software against breaches to their system, if there are approved certificates on their website, and have a separate bank wire account for just purchases.

Be sure to have firewalls on your computer, verify before opening embedded links by looking at the URL where it is coming from? Install anti-virus software and keep it up to date. Before clicking any link, go with your gut. When in doubt, don’t click.

We work with “A” rated Insurance Companies to ensure art collectors, galleries, museums, dealers, artists, and auctioneers that their works are properly taken care of. Get your free quote below.

5 Star Service for Art Insurance with ArtInsuranceNow.com

Are you an artist, art dealer, collector, exhibitor, or gallerist that requires asset protection? ArtInsuranceNow.com / Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc. has provided insurance services for the art community for 70 years. We love educating our customers and giving them the right tools to create or maintain a successful art business or collection.

Many artists surveyed do not have the proper insurance or coverage for their situation, the numbers are quite alarming. Our goal is to educate and provide resources that the art community requires to mitigate the unique risks they face.

As the global art market expands, risk also increases. Artists, auction houses, and art dealers often display art at multiple locations to discover a larger number of buyers, including a growing number of art fairs around the world like Art Basel.

The high volume of art exchanging hands increases the risk of improper handling, accidental damage during transit, and theft. Therefore, this increases the number of fine art insurance claims. If your art studio or location is not properly covered, you could be headed for a loss.

We at ArtInsuranceNow.com / Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc. take pride in our stellar customer service. (Don’t take our word for it, check our 5-star ratings on Google HERE) We will walk you through the process step by step and get you insured fast, and with great rates via our user-friendly online applications. We are uniquely qualified to handle all art related risk management solutions due to our extensive experience in the field, and to put it simply, we just love art!

Call us at 800-921-1008, apply online at ArtInsuranceNow.com and live chat with us, or visit our offices at 29 Broadway, Suite 1511 New York, NY 10006

A Jackson Pollock gets public view restoration

Jackson Pollock’s painting Number 1, 1949, is a swirl of multi-colored paint, dripped, flung and slung across a 5-by-8-foot canvas. It’s a textured work — including nails and a trapped bee  — and in the nearly 70 years since its creation, it’s attracted a fair bit of dust, dirt and grime.

That’s where conservator Chris Stavroudis comes in: His job is to clean the painting using swabs, solvents, and tiny brushes. For the last several months, he’s been hard at work, once a week, in full view of the public, in a gallery at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Some high school students watched Stavroudis wield his swabs — they have to make their own Pollocks for school, and want to know how he painted.

“The canvas was put on the floor and dribbled on,” Stavroudis explains. “He used sticks and dipped them into house paint, enamel paint, and then dribbled the paint off the stick and onto the canvas.”

There are many different reasons for conservation and although many conservators work on behalf of insurance companies to repair accidental damages it doesn’t mean they don’t also insure the works while in their possession.

ArtInsuranceNow.com has designed coverages to meet the specific needs of conservators. We help clients select adequate coverage for items in their care, custody, and control for restoration or conservation.

We cover items while:
In transit, on premises, at a work site, scheduled, and unnamed locations. Insuring an art practice is more than just protecting premises and stock against damage or theft. We provide seamless and flexible coverage for business exposures, as well. Even our most basic coverage provides solid protection.

For comprehensive Fine-Art Insurance Coverage call us at 800.921.1008 and visit ArtInsuranceNow.com

Took home a drunk date, now 2 Warhol’s destroyed, WTF?

Drunk woman pulls on mans tie

First Date Horror Story.

Authorities say an intoxicated Dallas woman who was on a first date with a prominent Houston trial lawyer caused at least $300,000 in damage to his art collection, including two Andy Warhol paintings.

Lindy Lou Layman, 29, was arrested on criminal mischief charges after her date with Anthony Buzbee. She was released on $30,000 bond.

Prosecutors say Buzbee, 49, told investigators that Layman got too intoxicated on their date, so he called her an Uber after they returned to his home. Buzbee said Layman refused to leave and hid inside the home, when he found her and called a second Uber, she got aggressive.

Authorities said she tore down several paintings and poured red wine on some while yelling obscenities. She also allegedly threw two $20,000 sculptures across the room and shattered them.

The damaged Warhol paintings were each valued at $500,000 in court documents.

Buzbee has represented high-profile figures, including former Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Then-candidate Donald Trump also visited his home last year when Buzbee held a fundraiser.

 

Collector’s Policy cover these scenarios?

YES! Visit ARTINSURANCENOW.COM because our Collector’s policy covers damages while Art is in the home. How is a loss settled? A restorer or appraiser will evaluate the work to determine the current condition and decide If the art can be repaired or not. If not, payment is based on the schedule amount or the current market price, if it’s a blanket policy

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Visit www.ArtInsuranceNow.com to learn more, apply below or feel free to contact us at 1.800.921.1008

Art Insurance Now Signature image

Caution! Art Claims are Taxable, Read on

Losing treasured items is traumatic enough, imagine being taxed for replacing them.

In an insightful article by leading tax professional Julian Block, the perils of being taxed on an Insurance claim for art that has appreciated are explained.

Using the received replacement value to purchase works of other types may not qualify you for the IRS’ “complete non-recognition of gain under the involuntary conversion rules”. This means you can be taxed.

Read the incisive article below and visit ArtInsuranceNow.com for comprehensive Fine Art coverages.

*The law authorizes an important tax break for a property owner who collects insurance (or other compensation) for property lost due to fire, theft or condemnation by a governmental authority. Ordinarily, you’re liable for an immediate tax on any excess over the cost basis of your property.

But a special rule permits taxes to be deferred if the proceeds are reinvested in similar property within the deadlines imposed by the IRS for replacement. For the “involuntary conversion” rules to apply, Code Section 1033 mandates that the replacement property has to be “similar or related in service or use” to the property replaced.

Understandably, words like “similar” lend themselves to different interpretations. Also understandable is that the IRS sometimes takes a hard-nosed approach.

Consider, for example, Letter Ruling 8127089. It held that oil paintings aren’t “similar” to lithographs so as to be eligible for involuntary conversion deferral.

The ruling dealt with a request for advice from someone I’ll call Irene Holmes. A fire in her home destroyed an art collection that included about 3,000 lithographs and a small number (about 1 percent of the entire collection) of oil paintings, pencil drawings, and wood carvings. A prudent Irene had insured the collection for its full current value. As current value exceeds her cost basis, a portion of the insurance proceeds represents gain.

Irene explained that she intends to use the proceeds from the insurance to purchase the replacement property. The replacements will consist of a mix of media — approximately 63 percent lithographs and 37 percent art works in other artistic media, such as oil paintings, watercolors, sculptures or other graphic forms of art — rather than reflect the composition of the lost artwork.

With that set of facts, the IRS “will not consider as property similar or related in service or use, art work in one medium, destroyed in whole or in part, replaced with art work in another medium. Therefore, in order to qualify for complete non-recognition of gain under the involuntary conversion rules,” the IRS spelled out what Irene has to do.

She “must purchase the same percentage of lithographs as were destroyed in whole or in part and the same percentage of art works in other artistic media as were destroyed in whole or in part.”

What happens if Irene decides to reinvest as proposed (63 percent in lithographs and 37 percent in other media? She’s going to be liable for taxes on the 37 percent of the proceeds that she reinvests in “other artistic media.”

Additional articles. A reminder for accountants who would welcome advice on how to alert clients to tactics that trim taxes for this year and even give a head start for next year: Delve into the archive of my articles (more than 225 and counting).

*Reprinted with permission from a Feb 20th, 2018 article by Julian Block.

About Julian Block

Attorney and author Julian Block is frequently quoted in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. He has been cited as “a leading tax professional” (New York Times), an “accomplished writer on taxes” (Wall Street Journal), and “an authority on tax planning” (Financial Planning magazine). More information about his books can be found at julianblocktaxexpert.com.

Risk exposures such as natural disasters and unexpected events like fire, flood, earthquakes, and storms, can cause extreme damage. Protect your art investments by obtaining an art insurance policy by Art Insurance Now / Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc.

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Visit www.ArtInsuranceNow.com to learn more, apply here or feel free to contact William Fleischer, CIC at 1.800.921.1008

Fire & Water, Devastates Artist’s Studio

Commissioned Princeton University Artist’s studio destroyed by firemen’s overspray. Did her Artist studio policy cover her? No! and this is why.

She never bought one. If she did, all of her artwork in racks, stands, files, and on walls, is covered.  Her materials and tools are covered.  Even the reference library is covered.

I feel for artists that see financial hardship when there is a loss similar to this.

For $1,000 per year, your art is covered up to $100,000, not just in the studio but also in transit, at exhibitions and in storage, everywhere worldwide.

Follow our link at the bottom of this article and purchase an Artist studio policy today.

Art studios give artists the space they need to create as well as a way to store their completed works of art and sell art from the studio. Due to the nature of the work in an art studio, art studio insurance is essential. Risk exposures such as natural disasters and unexpected events like fire, flood, earthquakes, and storms, can cause extreme damage to the building and contents. Protect these risks by obtaining an artist insurance policy offered by Art Insurance Now / Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc.

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Artist Studios Need Insurance Too

Many artists neglect to insure their practice because they mistakenly believe they’re already covered by a homeowner or rental policy—which are strictly limited in coverage to assets that aren’t considered part of a business. (Sorry, but at least in this case, your art, if it’s for sale, is considered a business.) Sometimes, insurance riders—essentially add-ons to a general policy—can be purchased to cover works of art or business practices, but an insurance brokerage like Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc. / ArtInsuranceNow.com concentrates in the more complicated policies that art insurance typically requires. Our agency is experienced at navigating provenance and the complicated methods for valuating works of art and a familiarity with insuring studios and art collections.

 

Other artists hesitate with insurance because they’re unsure at what point a work of art is technically finished—at what point it stops being a conglomerate of a couple hundred dollars’ worth of material, and starts becoming a valuable “piece.” Fortunately, in this case, the insurance industry is largely unconcerned with such philosophical questions. Generally speaking, insurance adjustors will use an artist’s past sales to determine valuation. If you sold a similar painting for $1,000 (and can provide legitimate documentation), expect a valuation of about $1,000, unless you’ve started working with precious metals.

 

Certainly, the most tragic losses in the event of a disaster are those of human life. Second to that, for many people in the arts, are cultural artifacts. Therefore, it’s important to insure our cultural legacy. Meanwhile, insurance companies can feel very far removed from the arts—with their talk of “assets”—and scare collectors, gallerists, and, yes, even artists, from maintaining proper insurance coverage.

 

We at Bernard Fleischer & Sons Inc. / ArtInsuranceNow.com speak the language of the arts as well as insurance and can bridge the gap between the art community and the insurance industry to protect the legacies of the collector, gallerist, museum and artist.

Visit us at www.ArtInsuranceNow.com to learn more or call us at 800-921-1008 to speak with someone who can help with your particular needs.

Estate Planning And Affluent Art Collectors

Art collectors, are you properly estate planning? We can help. visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com

Affluent art collectors are passionate about art. While they tend to expect their acquisitions to appreciate in value, they buy for personal and aesthetic reasons. Affluent art collectors are inclined to be extremely focused on acquiring and not very interested in disposing of art. This often means that at death they have amassed significant collections. What is surprisingly common is that many affluent art collectors do a substandard job of addressing their artwork in their estate plans.

Failing to plan for the disposition of collections upon death can prove quite costly to the family, as there is the potential to having to pay higher estate taxes. It can result in the unfair division of the art resulting in family conflict and litigation.

“Art is left to loved ones or other individuals, donated to charity directly, or in trust at the death of the collector. Proper planning means that the artwork is transferred to others very tax efficiently,” explains Frank Seneco, president of the advanced planning boutique Seneco & Associates. “Unfortunately, many times wealthy collectors have adopted the default option of not properly planning. For example, the collector is not sure which family members to leave which pieces to resulting in procrastinating and procrastinating until it’s too late. However, smart planning can often resolve these issues. One approach involves using corporate entities to own the art. This approach can not only address many ownership issues, it can simplify probate as there would not be the need to retitle the art.”

When dealing with meaningful and valuable collections, proper planning is more than constructing an estate plan. According to Evan Jehle, partner of FFO Business Management & Family Office, “Many of the ultra-wealthy have substantial art collections that they have not appropriately included in their estate plans. But, it’s more than just making sure the artwork is addressed in the plan. For example, with our clients we make sure they build files of ownership to make sure no questions arise concerning provenance. These files include certificates of authenticity, bills of sale, insurance records, and the like. A good rule of thumb is that the greater the distance between the collector and the artist and the older the artwork, the more likely there will be questions of provenance.”

Many wealthy individuals from business owners to celebrities do not construct effective estate plans. This is also true of a percentage of affluent art collectors. As in all these situations, by working with qualified professionals, the prosperous are able to ensure their wealth is passed on to whom they choose and done so while mitigating taxes.

Originally published Jan 08 2018, Forbes.com

Visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com or contact William Fleischer CIC at 212-566-1881 Ext 111

Could buying art make you rich?

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

For one investor that dream came true. The painting ‘Salvator Mundi’ believed to be painted by Leonardo da Vinci purchased for £45 just sold for $450 million. So, is investing in art a good way to get rich quick? And how should you proceed? “with extreme caution” say financial advisors.

While stories like the recent Leonardo da Vinci sale and endless Antiques Roadshow episodes make it seem very attractive to invest in paintings and objets d’art, such cases are relatively rare. What you get back is based on supply and demand and there are big movements upwards or downwards if particular works or artists come in or out of fashion.

Attending a neighborhood garage sale or popping into a local thrift store can leave a lot to be desired. After sifting through dented furniture, chipped ceramics, and strange art, one is often left feeling that the presented merchandise is worthless. But if you are lucky enough, you may just find a diamond in the rough.

Some Top Garage Sale Finds:

  • $3 for a Ceramic Bowl, Sold at Auction for $2.2 million
  • Andy Warhol Sketch Purchased for $5, Valued at $2 Million
  • 50 Cents for a Painting worth $10,000
  • Tiffany Mirror Purchased for $2, Valued at $25,000

 

Photo of Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)
Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)

The high sale price of the Leonardo painting was not typical, a recent academic study, based on examining data from 1.2 million auction house sales of paintings, drawings and prints, concluded that art appreciated in value by a modest 3.97% per year, in real US dollar terms, between 1957 and 2007.

Given the current environment of low interest rates, that’s still a better return than many savings accounts will give you. Paintings are seen as attractive investments because it’s very clear what you’re buying. Part of this is driven by investors’ desire for “real assets”.

Many investors lost money in the financial crisis by investing in products they did not understand, they are turning back to things such as art. Wealthy clients spend an increasing part of their wealth on art and collectibles.

You don’t necessarily have to be super-wealthy to invest in art.

Affordable Art Fair photoThe ArtInsuranceNow.com sponsored 2017 Spring Affordable Art Fair was an excellent example of great works of art that are accessible.  There are a growing number of art fairs and online marketplaces such as Artfinder aimed at buyers with a more modest budget.

The Affordable Art Fair (AAF), which started out in London’s Battersea Park in 1999, now holds fairs in more than 10 cities around the world. But while it may be becoming more affordable, just don’t bet on becoming a millionaire yourself.

With a keen eye and a lot of luck you may come across a valuable find but most art industry experts suggest that you buy a piece of art because you like it, not because you want to get rich. “If it goes up in value that should be just an added bonus.”

Protect your valued finds by visiting us at ArtInsuranceNow.com, voted a 2017 Top Broker and listed as the “Cream of the crop” in our respective area of Art Insurance by Insurance Business Magazine. We can help with all Art related insurance requirements. Apply here or Contact William Fleischer CIC at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.