Category Archives: Fine Art

Iconic Muhammad Ali print stolen from museum.

The Print, which was stolen while the museum was open to the public depicted Ali in a classic boxing pose painted in the brilliantly colored, expressionist style that LeRoy Neiman was known for. Brazen thieves ripped the print from the wall even with security cameras watching, It’s important to understand the value of art insurance and protect yourself by covering your valuable collection.

Although risk extends beyond theft (47 percent of art loss is attributed to damage during transit according to The New York Times) art trafficking is a very real thing and according to statistics ranks third behind drugs and arms.

In a case of  theft, the loss is irreversible. Not only the artwork is irreplaceable itself but also even the reputation of the organization suffers from a mere fact that such situation has occurred. Without having a comprehensive fine art collectors insurance from a trustworthy art insurance broker, the masterpieces are subjected to risk.

Apply for coverage here or call me if you have any questions or to discuss your options.

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

 

David Bowie’s Art Collection to be auctioned, how would a collectors policy respond?

Not just David Bowie’s Estate sends work to the art auctions but individual collectors do also.

The most popular conversations I have are collectors looking to insure their work while in transit to an auction house like Christie’s, Sotheby’s, de Pury, and Phillips house.

Many times the auction house will either visit the collection or ask the collector to send the item to be auctioned directly to the house, either to be further evaluated or to be inserted into the auction rotation.

The preferred Collector’s insurance policy I like to sell, include and is not limited to coverage in transit and away from premises, in exhibitions and in storage and does not exclude auction houses.

The evaluation of the Art is based on two different models. Depending on the Art Insurance Company policy wording, One base is on the schedule amounts of the item on file (either with the Insurance company or the Collector) and the other is based on the current market value (onus of proof is on the collector).

In the case of David Bowie, Jim Hendrix or even Robin Williams, the auction house receives these items on consignment and will charge a hefty fee to insure them while on the premises.  I advise my clients to not use auction house insurance because most of the policies I sell have coverage for unnamed locations or broad enough to cover the works given for sale on a stated amount.

One of the downfalls of using the insurance, the auction houses give you, is how their insurance establishes values of the art at claim time.  Usually, it is not based on the artwork consignment agreement but on the lowest estimated value. The cost to you for using their insurance is usually much more expensive than what you are currently paying. The standard auction house’s most common policies have wording to the effect of;

Property of others consigned to you for auction, at the lowest pre-sale estimate” and “Where no consignment receipt exists but the article appears on your records fully described, such property shall be valued at the lowest anticipated pre-sale estimate or the amount for which you are held legally liable, whichever is less”

This may be lower than your schedule or market value to entice attention for a bidding war.

When in doubt, call me to discuss your unique situation.

William

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

What to ask Art Gallery/Dealer before consigning your Art

Damage to Art happens more often than is reported. How can you make sure you are covered?

American Airlines, along with seven other art handling companies, is being sued for damage to a slash sculpture by Lucio Fontana. the damage work occurred while it was being shipped to the New York Armory Show.  Lloyd’s of London was the insurer for the gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art.

Most art claims arise from transit damages, this is so important to make sure your current Art Insurance policy covers losses while your fine art, antiques, and collectibles are being shipped.  Most policies do not restrict the mode of transportation be it Air, Train, Boat or Truck, but they do restrict using the United Postal Service’s regular mail.

The Swiss art trading company AGB Contemporary AG consigned Concetto Spaziale (1955-60) to Marc Selwyn with a sale price of €175,000 ($196,000), according to the ArtNews newspaper. When the work was actually damaged is difficult to figure out.

The Art was packed and stored by World Freight outside of Paris, then trucked to  Charles de Gaulle airport for JFK via American Airlines flight to New York. One week later, the sculpture was transported to the Armory Show where it was uncreated and the damage discovered.

Now, this is where I find it interesting.  Lloyd’s paid Marc Selwyn Fine Art $104,250 to cover the insurance money due.  But the work was for sale for $196,000 why did Lloyds of London pay out less?  My theory has a few variables.

The Art Dealer, Marc Selwyn Fine Art policy had a valuation clause of % of sale price or a % of consignment agreement minus a deductible.  Sidebar comment: checks are made to the dealer, not the lender, which could be a problem if the dealer holds back or refuses to pay the lender, it is recommended you ask to be a loss payee on all valuable work given to dealers/galleries.

These 3 variables are important to ask if you are the collector trusting your art, to a dealer.

  1. What is your policy evaluation clause if the work is stolen or damaged? Typical dealer valuation is selling price minus 20% or 30%.
  2. What is the valuation based on Consignment? usually consigned amount plus 10%.  But what if work was double consigned? most policies are silent on this and would have to be clarified by the company or the courts.
  3. What is the deductible on the policy, $1,000, $10,000, $100,000?
  4. Are there any restrictions on the method of travel? to countries?
  5. I highly recommend the lender to be named as a loss payee on the dealer policy, in the event anything should happen to the consigned work.

Each situation is different. Circumstances and risk tolerances evolving around the” business of Art” should be explored to help mitigate losses due to the unforeseen perils in the world we live in.

William Fleischer, CIC

800-921-1008 ext 111

www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

AXA Art Insurance Company

 
Good News! After 29 years in the Insurance Business, I have partnered up with   AXA and Travelers Insurance Company. We can now negotiate favorable terms and conditions with very competitive pricing. I now have the facility to insure all types and size collections, Dealers, Museums and Non-profit galleries.
If you are involved in the art world, I can insure your exposures.

• Commercial Art • Art and Antique Dealers • Restore and Conservators • Museums • Private collectors • Large or Small inventories. • Domestic or International. • Art Fair transportation, while at fair,     shipped to collectors • Art loaned to Museums or non- profits, • Art being shipped or carried on board, • Coverage for special events, Parties,     Gala’s, Dinners. • Non-profit organizations and more

There are special policies so broad that besides the standard theft or breakage coverage’s it actually includes mold and devaluation of the art pieces due to a loss. The premiums begin around $2,500 for about $250,000 worth of protection.

Recent successes:  An Art dealer who brings works to various fairs and sells from her private gallery just purchased this policy

$300,000 premises limit $300,000 unnamed location $300,000 while in transit We set the unnamed location limit and transit limit as matching limits to avoid any gaps in coverage. Premium is $3100 with $1,000 deductible.

The Genuine Article“Total flexibility with market-leading security – the ultimate high-net-worth coverage for art and antique collectibles, buildings, and contents.”
Call me with your questions.

William G. Fleischer, CIC 212 566-1881 ext 111 wfleischer@bfbond.com

Dealer Insurance, Museum Insurance, Corporate/Private Fine Art, and Collectibles Insurance.

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Insuring Art Work at Market Value

Collecting Art is fun, but maintaining values fluctuate a lot on an insurance policy.  All homeowners policies where fine art is a part of the policy are written on a scheduled basis.

To add these artworks to your schedule, the company requires a current bill of sale or a current appraisal.  The value is locked based on the schedule, good if the value goes down, bad if the values goes up.

Here is an endorsement which I feel the collector should consider when they are insuring an art collection.

It’s the Current Market Value 150.  With this endorsement, the company will pay the amount shown on the Schedule for which the item is insured. However, if the market value of the itemized article immediately before the loss or damage exceeds the amount of itemized coverage for that article, we will pay its “current market value” immediately before the loss or damage up to 150% of the amount of the itemized coverage for that article. Of course, if the item market value decrease you will get less.

For a quote on Fine Art, Collectibles and objects of value click here for the collectors application on my website.

 

 

Insuring art work in transit to auction houses

Recently with all the Auction houses in full mode, I have been receiving many phone calls concerning artwork in transit.

The main movement of Art and Collectibles are going to the Auction houses. Most of the time, Individual’s would send the auction house information about the work, and if acceptable, the burden of insurance falls on the collector to get the work to the Auction house.

Most collectors who sell through auction houses, don’t think about coverage while it is at the Auction house.  Many Auction houses charge very high rates for this coverage , which in many circumstances are included in my design of the policy.

Granted, you can buy a one-way art or collectibles transit policy that stops once the work is received, or you can think beyond and purchase a policy which at times include insurance coverage while shipping to Auction Houses, Galleries, Storage, and framers.

Complete my form for collectors, and let’s figure out an Art Insurance program which fits your style.

William G. Fleischer, CIC

www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

Use UCC filings when you Cosign your Art to a Dealer.

Recently, while I was discussing art with an attorney, UCC filings came up.   Usually, this is filed when you take out a business or personal loans and the lender to protect its collateral files the UCC with the state.

It’s an inexpensive file, which is used to notify the state you are a lender and have claim to the object corresponding to the UCC.

So I always tell everyone when you lend for sale your Art, to always have an expiration of consignment, in case the other party gets in financial difficulties the asset reverts to you at the end of the consignment date.

But now adding the UCC you attach yourself to the asset so any court can recognize you are in line to be paid if the art is sold.

An interesting layer of protection from an unstable partnership.

 

William

www.artinsurancenow.com

How is your Art being Insured?

Every day, I am helping to insure art collections.  art collections, Gun Collections, Rug Collections, Rare Books Collection, Prehistoric Art collections, Samurai Swords, Bibles,

In the past few days, I have insured rare books, Bibles, Photographs, Manuscripts Antique guns, and furniture. click here for applications

Your homeowner’s policy excludes perils like Roof leaking, wind-driven rain, back up of sewers and drains, Breakage, transit Loss of Value due to a loss.

Most fine art policies have these coverages included. If there is something which is valuable to you and your family, I can insure it.

Call Me 800-921-1008

William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
T. 212 566-1881 ext 111
F. 212 566-1615
wfleischer@bfbond.com
www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

Everyday I learn something New and fascinating – Intaglio.

Today I learned a new word. I was reviewing a schedule of fine art insurance and came across a word which I was not familiar, Intaglio Art.

Intaglio Art, what can this be? So off to the land of Google search, I came across the definition in Wikipedia;

Intaglio Example

Intaglio is a technique in art, in which an image is created by cutting, carving or engraving into a flat surface and may also refer to objects made using these techniques:

 

I then looked up some pictures and this stuff is really cool
We proudly insure this type of work. Let us insure yours, Visit us at www.artinsurancenow.com, call 1.800.921.1008

art insuranceLet me insure yours

www.artinsurancenow.com

 

 

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance New Program
Auctioneer
Conservators/Restorers
Corporate Collections
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability

Art Evaluation formulas you might see in an Art Collection Policy

Here are most of the current options found in an Art Collectors Insurance policy

1. Stated Amount based on an appraisal.
2. Market value or appraised value whichever is less.
3. Market value or appraised value. Maximum value 1.5% of appraisal value.
4. Market value – Onus of proof ( insured to prove value) up to policy limit.
5. Unscheduled Items: can be based on maximum value per item –Maximum Blanket limit- Onus of proof for valuation
6. Newly Acquired Property their cash value, but not more than 25% on similar type of policy.
7. Newly Acquired Property the lesser of 25% on similar type on policy or $10,000.
8. The cost of reasonably restoring that property to it condition immediately before the loss
9. The cost of replacing that property with a substantially identical property.
10. Property of Others in your Care, Custody, and control Maximum, based on the agreed amount prior to Loss 25% of Policy Limit,
11. Jointly Owned Property, value as stated in an agreement with the co-owner(s) up to the amount of your interest.
12. A loss to your Art Reference library, including books, catalogs and “data and Media” Settled at Actual Cash Value.

William
William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
212 566-1881 ext 111
wfleischer@bfbond.com
www.BFbond.com
www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance New Program
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Corporate Collections
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability