Could buying art make you rich?

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

For one investor that dream came true. The painting ‘Salvator Mundi’ believed to be painted by Leonardo da Vinci purchased for £45 just sold for $450 million. So, is investing in art a good way to get rich quick? And how should you proceed? “with extreme caution” say financial advisors.

While stories like the recent Leonardo da Vinci sale and endless Antiques Roadshow episodes make it seem very attractive to invest in paintings and objets d’art, such cases are relatively rare. What you get back is based on supply and demand and there are big movements upwards or downwards if particular works or artists come in or out of fashion.

Attending a neighborhood garage sale or popping into a local thrift store can leave a lot to be desired. After sifting through dented furniture, chipped ceramics, and strange art, one is often left feeling that the presented merchandise is worthless. But if you are lucky enough, you may just find a diamond in the rough.

Some Top Garage Sale Finds:

  • $3 for a Ceramic Bowl, Sold at Auction for $2.2 million
  • Andy Warhol Sketch Purchased for $5, Valued at $2 Million
  • 50 Cents for a Painting worth $10,000
  • Tiffany Mirror Purchased for $2, Valued at $25,000

 

Photo of Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)

Salvator Mundi (Leonardo da Vinci)

The high sale price of the Leonardo painting was not typical, a recent academic study, based on examining data from 1.2 million auction house sales of paintings, drawings and prints, concluded that art appreciated in value by a modest 3.97% per year, in real US dollar terms, between 1957 and 2007.

Given the current environment of low interest rates, that’s still a better return than many savings accounts will give you. Paintings are seen as attractive investments because it’s very clear what you’re buying. Part of this is driven by investors’ desire for “real assets”.

Many investors lost money in the financial crisis by investing in products they did not understand, they are turning back to things such as art. Wealthy clients spend an increasing part of their wealth on art and collectibles.

You don’t necessarily have to be super-wealthy to invest in art.

Affordable Art Fair photoThe ArtInsuranceNow.com sponsored 2017 Spring Affordable Art Fair was an excellent example of great works of art that are accessible.  There are a growing number of art fairs and online marketplaces such as Artfinder aimed at buyers with a more modest budget.

The Affordable Art Fair (AAF), which started out in London’s Battersea Park in 1999, now holds fairs in more than 10 cities around the world. But while it may be becoming more affordable, just don’t bet on becoming a millionaire yourself.

With a keen eye and a lot of luck you may come across a valuable find but most art industry experts suggest that you buy a piece of art because you like it, not because you want to get rich. “If it goes up in value that should be just an added bonus.”

Protect your valued finds by visiting us at ArtInsuranceNow.com, voted a 2017 Top Broker and listed as the “Cream of the crop” in our respective area of Art Insurance by Insurance Business Magazine. We can help with all Art related insurance requirements. Apply here or Contact William Fleischer CIC at 800.921.1008 to discuss your unique situation.