Category Archives: Comtemporary Art Insurance

The Art Police

Detective Don Hrycyk , LAPD Art Theft Detail, shows a fake Jim Dine painting, left, and a fake Renoir painting “La Loge (also called Au Theatre)

If you believe Hollywood’s version, the average art thief has many gadgets, scales walls, and dances through laser beam alarm triggers to steal Rembrandts and Renoirs. But when Detective Don Hrycyk of the LAPD Art Theft Detail solves an art crime, the guilty party is usually a trusted friend or business associate of the victim, not Tom Cruise in a catsuit.

The problem isn’t always smart criminals, Many leave themselves vulnerable to opportunists, with state of the art alarm systems that are never turned on, treasures locked away in safes with the combination left in an unlocked drawer nearby. Detective Hrycyk has seen it all.

The Art Theft Detail was formed by the LAPD in 1983 in response to a rash of unsolved High-value art thefts. It was a smart decision as they have recovered $122,999,616 in artwork since 1993. It is the only law enforcement unit in the country dedicated to fighting art crimes full-time.

They investigate by publicizing thefts and staying in constant contact with local galleries, museums, auction houses, and collectors. They tackle everything from phony estate sales stocked with fake antiques to consignment fraud, home burglaries, art-related insurance scams, and occasionally dramatic heists.

Picasso’s 1937 drawing “Faune”, for example, was recovered back in 2001 after a man tried to sell his $100,000 “ugly painting” to Christie’s in Beverly Hills. An alert appraiser checked the LAPD website, saw the stolen work and called the police. Turns out the thief was a chauffeur who had broken into the house of his movie-producer boss.

Sometimes it isn’t a very happy ending though, sculptor Kewal Soni had a break in and lost a $10,000 sculpture that he worked on for a year. The burglar then took it to a metal recycling plant and sold it as scrap for a measly $9.10. Although later the thief was caught and convicted.

The importance of insuring your art cannot be overstated. Art is a passion for most and when you love something it’s natural to want to protect it. Allow us to help by providing easy to understand comprehensive insurance coverage for your artwork.

Already covered? Let us examine your current Artist’s, Collector’s, Dealer’s, Conservator’s, Gallery’s, or Museum’s policy. Maybe you’re overpaying, under protected or have the wrong coverages.

Our policies have diverse coverages to meet the specific requirements of the Art Community. We help clients select adequate coverage and to help mitigate potential exposures, we provide recommended loss control procedures.

 

 

 

 

 

A Jackson Pollock gets public view restoration

Jackson Pollock’s painting Number 1, 1949, is a swirl of multi-colored paint, dripped, flung and slung across a 5-by-8-foot canvas. It’s a textured work — including nails and a trapped bee  — and in the nearly 70 years since its creation, it’s attracted a fair bit of dust, dirt and grime.

That’s where conservator Chris Stavroudis comes in: His job is to clean the painting using swabs, solvents, and tiny brushes. For the last several months, he’s been hard at work, once a week, in full view of the public, in a gallery at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Some high school students watched Stavroudis wield his swabs — they have to make their own Pollocks for school, and want to know how he painted.

“The canvas was put on the floor and dribbled on,” Stavroudis explains. “He used sticks and dipped them into house paint, enamel paint, and then dribbled the paint off the stick and onto the canvas.”

There are many different reasons for conservation and although many conservators work on behalf of insurance companies to repair accidental damages it doesn’t mean they don’t also insure the works while in their possession.

ArtInsuranceNow.com has designed coverages to meet the specific needs of conservators. We help clients select adequate coverage for items in their care, custody, and control for restoration or conservation.

We cover items while:
In transit, on premises, at a work site, scheduled, and unnamed locations. Insuring an art practice is more than just protecting premises and stock against damage or theft. We provide seamless and flexible coverage for business exposures, as well. Even our most basic coverage provides solid protection.

For comprehensive Fine-Art Insurance Coverage call us at 800.921.1008 and visit ArtInsuranceNow.com

Took home a drunk date, now 2 Warhol’s destroyed, WTF?

Drunk woman pulls on mans tie

First Date Horror Story.

Authorities say an intoxicated Dallas woman who was on a first date with a prominent Houston trial lawyer caused at least $300,000 in damage to his art collection, including two Andy Warhol paintings.

Lindy Lou Layman, 29, was arrested on criminal mischief charges after her date with Anthony Buzbee. She was released on $30,000 bond.

Prosecutors say Buzbee, 49, told investigators that Layman got too intoxicated on their date, so he called her an Uber after they returned to his home. Buzbee said Layman refused to leave and hid inside the home, when he found her and called a second Uber, she got aggressive.

Authorities said she tore down several paintings and poured red wine on some while yelling obscenities. She also allegedly threw two $20,000 sculptures across the room and shattered them.

The damaged Warhol paintings were each valued at $500,000 in court documents.

Buzbee has represented high-profile figures, including former Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Then-candidate Donald Trump also visited his home last year when Buzbee held a fundraiser.

 

Collector’s Policy cover these scenarios?

YES! Visit ARTINSURANCENOW.COM because our Collector’s policy covers damages while Art is in the home. How is a loss settled? A restorer or appraiser will evaluate the work to determine the current condition and decide If the art can be repaired or not. If not, payment is based on the schedule amount or the current market price, if it’s a blanket policy

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Visit www.ArtInsuranceNow.com to learn more, apply below or feel free to contact us at 1.800.921.1008

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Estate Planning And Affluent Art Collectors

Art collectors, are you properly estate planning? We can help. visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com

Affluent art collectors are passionate about art. While they tend to expect their acquisitions to appreciate in value, they buy for personal and aesthetic reasons. Affluent art collectors are inclined to be extremely focused on acquiring and not very interested in disposing of art. This often means that at death they have amassed significant collections. What is surprisingly common is that many affluent art collectors do a substandard job of addressing their artwork in their estate plans.

Failing to plan for the disposition of collections upon death can prove quite costly to the family, as there is the potential to having to pay higher estate taxes. It can result in the unfair division of the art resulting in family conflict and litigation.

“Art is left to loved ones or other individuals, donated to charity directly, or in trust at the death of the collector. Proper planning means that the artwork is transferred to others very tax efficiently,” explains Frank Seneco, president of the advanced planning boutique Seneco & Associates. “Unfortunately, many times wealthy collectors have adopted the default option of not properly planning. For example, the collector is not sure which family members to leave which pieces to resulting in procrastinating and procrastinating until it’s too late. However, smart planning can often resolve these issues. One approach involves using corporate entities to own the art. This approach can not only address many ownership issues, it can simplify probate as there would not be the need to retitle the art.”

When dealing with meaningful and valuable collections, proper planning is more than constructing an estate plan. According to Evan Jehle, partner of FFO Business Management & Family Office, “Many of the ultra-wealthy have substantial art collections that they have not appropriately included in their estate plans. But, it’s more than just making sure the artwork is addressed in the plan. For example, with our clients we make sure they build files of ownership to make sure no questions arise concerning provenance. These files include certificates of authenticity, bills of sale, insurance records, and the like. A good rule of thumb is that the greater the distance between the collector and the artist and the older the artwork, the more likely there will be questions of provenance.”

Many wealthy individuals from business owners to celebrities do not construct effective estate plans. This is also true of a percentage of affluent art collectors. As in all these situations, by working with qualified professionals, the prosperous are able to ensure their wealth is passed on to whom they choose and done so while mitigating taxes.

Originally published Jan 08 2018, Forbes.com

Visit us at ArtInsuranceNow.com or contact William Fleischer CIC at 212-566-1881 Ext 111

As Art Basel Miami 2016 approaches, we look at the necessity of a good art insurance policy.

artbasel-miami-beachArt Basel, the international art fair with three shows staged annually in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong. The shows offer parallel programming produced in collaboration with the host city’s local institutions. Art Basel provides a platform for galleries to show and sell their work to collectors, museum directors and curators. The 2015 show in Miami presented 267 leading international galleries from 32 countries. Over five days the show attracted 77,000 visitors including private collectors and directors, curators, trustees and patrons of nearly 200 museum and institution groups. The show hosted first-time collectors from Cambodia, Ethiopia, Nicaragua, Romania, Togo and Zimbabwe. That’s a lot of art moving around and collectors Art policies should cover Art, when purchased, on consignment and in transit, it’s about knowing your coverage situation before it’s too late.

art-basel-miamiThe transportation of art is a tricky thing, and as fine art transportation insurance leaders we can tell you exactly what you require to know so that your insurance program will be effective and  cover you properly.  Insurance coverage during transportation, installation and exhibition of irreplaceable works of art, antiquities, and memorabilia isn’t optional and the best way to obtain the finest coverage is to visit artinsurancenow.com or call us at 800.921.1008 to speak with a knowledgeable fine art broker that can advocate for you in seeking the best possible insurance terms.

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Iconic Muhammad Ali print stolen from museum.

The Print, which was stolen while the museum was open to the public depicted Ali in a classic boxing pose painted in the brilliantly colored, expressionist style that LeRoy Neiman was known for. Brazen thieves ripped the print from the wall even with security cameras watching, It’s important to understand the value of art insurance and protect yourself by covering your valuable collection.

Although risk extends beyond theft (47 percent of art loss is attributed to damage during transit according to The New York Times) art trafficking is a very real thing and according to statistics ranks third behind drugs and arms.

In a case of  theft, the loss is irreversible. Not only the artwork is irreplaceable itself but also even the reputation of the organization suffers from a mere fact that such situation has occurred. Without having a comprehensive fine art collectors insurance from a trustworthy art insurance broker, the masterpieces are subjected to risk.

Apply for coverage here or call me if you have any questions or to discuss your options.

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

 

David Bowie’s Art Collection to be auctioned, how would a collectors policy respond?

Not just David Bowie’s Estate sends work to the art auctions but individual collectors do also.

The most popular conversations I have are collectors looking to insure their work while in transit to an auction house like Christie’s, Sotheby’s, de Pury, and Phillips house.

Many times the auction house will either visit the collection or ask the collector to send the item to be auctioned directly to the house, either to be further evaluated or to be inserted into the auction rotation.

The preferred Collector’s insurance policy I like to sell, include and is not limited to coverage in transit and away from premises, in exhibitions and in storage and does not exclude auction houses.

The evaluation of the Art is based on two different models. Depending on the Art Insurance Company policy wording, One base is on the schedule amounts of the item on file (either with the Insurance company or the Collector) and the other is based on the current market value (onus of proof is on the collector).

In the case of David Bowie, Jim Hendrix or even Robin Williams, the auction house receives these items on consignment and will charge a hefty fee to insure them while on the premises.  I advise my clients to not use auction house insurance because most of the policies I sell have coverage for unnamed locations or broad enough to cover the works given for sale on a stated amount.

One of the downfalls of using the insurance, the auction houses give you, is how their insurance establishes values of the art at claim time.  Usually, it is not based on the artwork consignment agreement but on the lowest estimated value. The cost to you for using their insurance is usually much more expensive than what you are currently paying. The standard auction house’s most common policies have wording to the effect of;

Property of others consigned to you for auction, at the lowest pre-sale estimate” and “Where no consignment receipt exists but the article appears on your records fully described, such property shall be valued at the lowest anticipated pre-sale estimate or the amount for which you are held legally liable, whichever is less”

This may be lower than your schedule or market value to entice attention for a bidding war.

When in doubt, call me to discuss your unique situation.

William

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

AXA Art Insurance Company

 
Good News! After 29 years in the Insurance Business, I have partnered up with   AXA and Travelers Insurance Company. We can now negotiate favorable terms and conditions with very competitive pricing. I now have the facility to insure all types and size collections, Dealers, Museums and Non-profit galleries.
If you are involved in the art world, I can insure your exposures.

• Commercial Art • Art and Antique Dealers • Restore and Conservators • Museums • Private collectors • Large or Small inventories. • Domestic or International. • Art Fair transportation, while at fair,     shipped to collectors • Art loaned to Museums or non- profits, • Art being shipped or carried on board, • Coverage for special events, Parties,     Gala’s, Dinners. • Non-profit organizations and more

There are special policies so broad that besides the standard theft or breakage coverage’s it actually includes mold and devaluation of the art pieces due to a loss. The premiums begin around $2,500 for about $250,000 worth of protection.

Recent successes:  An Art dealer who brings works to various fairs and sells from her private gallery just purchased this policy

$300,000 premises limit $300,000 unnamed location $300,000 while in transit We set the unnamed location limit and transit limit as matching limits to avoid any gaps in coverage. Premium is $3100 with $1,000 deductible.

The Genuine Article“Total flexibility with market-leading security – the ultimate high-net-worth coverage for art and antique collectibles, buildings, and contents.”
Call me with your questions.

William G. Fleischer, CIC 212 566-1881 ext 111 wfleischer@bfbond.com

Dealer Insurance, Museum Insurance, Corporate/Private Fine Art, and Collectibles Insurance.

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Insuring Art Work at Market Value

Collecting Art is fun, but maintaining values fluctuate a lot on an insurance policy.  All homeowners policies where fine art is a part of the policy are written on a scheduled basis.

To add these artworks to your schedule, the company requires a current bill of sale or a current appraisal.  The value is locked based on the schedule, good if the value goes down, bad if the values goes up.

Here is an endorsement which I feel the collector should consider when they are insuring an art collection.

It’s the Current Market Value 150.  With this endorsement, the company will pay the amount shown on the Schedule for which the item is insured. However, if the market value of the itemized article immediately before the loss or damage exceeds the amount of itemized coverage for that article, we will pay its “current market value” immediately before the loss or damage up to 150% of the amount of the itemized coverage for that article. Of course, if the item market value decrease you will get less.

For a quote on Fine Art, Collectibles and objects of value click here for the collectors application on my website.

 

 

Insuring art work in transit to auction houses

Recently with all the Auction houses in full mode, I have been receiving many phone calls concerning artwork in transit.

The main movement of Art and Collectibles are going to the Auction houses. Most of the time, Individual’s would send the auction house information about the work, and if acceptable, the burden of insurance falls on the collector to get the work to the Auction house.

Most collectors who sell through auction houses, don’t think about coverage while it is at the Auction house.  Many Auction houses charge very high rates for this coverage , which in many circumstances are included in my design of the policy.

Granted, you can buy a one-way art or collectibles transit policy that stops once the work is received, or you can think beyond and purchase a policy which at times include insurance coverage while shipping to Auction Houses, Galleries, Storage, and framers.

Complete my form for collectors, and let’s figure out an Art Insurance program which fits your style.

William G. Fleischer, CIC

www.ArtInsuranceNow.com