Category Archives: Artist Insurance

Iconic Muhammad Ali print stolen from museum.

The Print, which was stolen while the museum was open to the public depicted Ali in a classic boxing pose painted in the brilliantly colored, expressionist style that LeRoy Neiman was known for. Brazen thieves ripped the print from the wall even with security cameras watching, It’s important to understand the value of art insurance and protect yourself by covering your valuable collection.

Although risk extends beyond theft (47 percent of art loss is attributed to damage during transit according to The New York Times) art trafficking is a very real thing and according to statistics ranks third behind drugs and arms.

In a case of  theft, the loss is irreversible. Not only the artwork is irreplaceable itself but also even the reputation of the organization suffers from a mere fact that such situation has occurred. Without having a comprehensive fine art collectors insurance from a trustworthy art insurance broker, the masterpieces are subjected to risk.

Apply for coverage here or call me if you have any questions or to discuss your options.

William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal
T: 212 566-1881 ext.111
E: wfleischer@bfbond.com
W: ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

 

Artist Studio Insurance “The Pitfalls”

Artist’s who work out of their home may think they have coverage with their Homeowner insurance company, but do they?

I get it, most artists have lofts, special rooms or detached structures where they create, show and sell their art.

The Limitation and Exclusion: Business personal property on premises.

Here is the simple 2 question test if the exclusion applies. If you answer yes, an Artist Insurance policy is recommended

  • Continuity of activity
  • Monetary gain (profit motive)

Homeowners Insurance Policies for Owners or Tenants are designed to protect you and your personal property.  These policies contain liability for trip and fall, house parties, lawsuits against you and members of the household for bodily injury or property damage to someone or their stuff.

 

The exclusions/limitations for a business in your home are very limited unless you take some measures to add back coverages.

The Homeowner Insurance Policies are very strict and are looking to avoid anything to do with a business in the home, unless they know about it and add special endorsements.

First, I would like to point out that any art, materials, books or paperwork stored in a detached structure, voids coverage for that structure unless it is added by endorsement to the policy.  If the “Art stuff” is in the home than it will not void the insurance coverage, but the limit for business property is usually $2,500.00 and work you created is not valued at retail price, but just materials.

Secondly, Liability is not covered by the Homeowner’s policy for anything to do with the business, if someone got hurt during a studio visit, the claim would be denied.

To somewhat fix this, add “other structures on the residence’s premises”, if the value exceeds the basic coverage on the current policy.  To protect you from trip and fall claims, add, “Permitted Incidental Occupancies”. Note the situation where you have more than $2,500 of personal property, you should be looking for an Artist carve out policy, like an Artist Studio Policy.

When it comes to the Liability, the homeowners have a few endorsements you could use, “Permitted Incidental Occupancies”, usually costing  $27.00 for $500,000 worth of coverage, but they have limitations, such as premises only, no additional insured’s and no products or completed operation coverage. It’s best to look for a carve-out policy for this too.  I recommend buying a separate Business owner’s policy for just simple fixtures since all the others should be insured in my program.

In conclusion:

Artist’s who create at home are better to have an Artist policy which evaluates the work using retail value, not materials cost.  An artist policy which includes, All works for sale, materials, tools, reference library, transportation, while in storage, at Exhibitions and worldwide; All the coverages loaded into my Artist Policy Program.

For more information visit us at www.artinsurancenow.com to fill out a quick EZ application for a fast, free quote.

To discuss your particular situation contact me,

William G Fleischer  CIC                                                                                             Principal                                                                                                                                  T: 212 566-1881 ext.111                                             wfleischer@bfbond.com

 

Newly Designed Artist Insurance Policy Protecting your Art.

Our new Artist Insurance Policy is designed for the active Artist.  Your Art is covered while in the Studio, in Transit, while at Exhibitions and when in storage.  No more worrying about, Theft, Fire, Water Damage or Vandalism. These coverages and more are covered in our Artist Insurance Policies.

Worldwide coverage: Whether you show in Venice, Hong Kong, Paris or any of the Art Basel locations! Everywhere the USA has a trade agreement. Our policy will cover your Art in Transit, Storage and while at galleries and exhibitions.

Highlights of coverages:

  • Artwork in the studio, up to $300,000.
  • Art is covered While in Transit, At Exhibitions, In Storage and Worldwide.
  • A XIV Rated Insurance Company (by A.M. Best).
  • No Membership, No fees, No Maximum per item, and No Appraisals or Schedules.
  • Very low $1,000 deductible.
  • Best loss settlement valuation. Selling price less 30%. Includes Works in Progress.
  • Supplies, Canvas, Materials, Paints, Frames, Tools and Reference libraries are also Included.
  • Replacement Cost of Studio Tools and Equipment.

For more information or to discuss your particular situation contact me, William G. Fleischer CIC | Principal.  T: 212 566-1881 ext.111 or visit us at www.artinsurancenow.com to fill out a quick EZ application for a fast, free quote.

 

Use UCC filings when you Cosign your Art to a Dealer.

Recently, while I was discussing art with an attorney, UCC filings came up.   Usually, this is filed when you take out a business or personal loans and the lender to protect its collateral files the UCC with the state.

It’s an inexpensive file, which is used to notify the state you are a lender and have claim to the object corresponding to the UCC.

So I always tell everyone when you lend for sale your Art, to always have an expiration of consignment, in case the other party gets in financial difficulties the asset reverts to you at the end of the consignment date.

But now adding the UCC you attach yourself to the asset so any court can recognize you are in line to be paid if the art is sold.

An interesting layer of protection from an unstable partnership.

 

William

www.artinsurancenow.com

Artist work covered while in the process of making it?

“Damage sustained during any process or while actually being worked upon and resulting therefrom unless caused by fire or explosion.”

As an artist policy, the policy will cover completed works and works that are still in progress. Artists can be working on several projects at once and may complete them at varying times or never finish them at all.

The inspiration may be lacking to finish a project, but we do not want to cover things that do not seem to fit, work, or just do not seem right. So, we do not cover while it is being worked upon whether that process is painting, modeling, carving, cutting or whatever process they use to create the art.

 

Call 212 566-1881 ask for William or visit www.artinsurancenow.com

How to evaluate your own work as an artist

Since my Launch of an Artist’s Insurance website: I have had numerous conversations regarding “How an Insurance Company evaluates Art.”

The policy evaluation is straightforward. Sales price minus 30%.

This is a simple formula if you have a track record of sales.  Where the conversation turns, is when the artist is new to the market.  I say this because I have worked with artists who, at various ages and experience are now, entering group shows and exhibitions.

A seasoned artist knows the consignment agreement or the exhibition agreement requires the artist to place a value of their Artwork in the form, but for the neophyte, this is where the “tire hits the Road” or the “paint hits the canvas” and takes the discussion deeper.

So what are the methods of pricing one’s own work, and will the insurance company accept the sale price of an artist, who never sold?

This is how I approach the question.

First, everything has a value.  Fundamentally;  material, time, education, experience, teachers, demographics, size shape, media, subject, along with time spent, researching and actually producing the work. etc…

Of course, the Artist understands this, but what is the valuation sale price, I tell them to just make up a reasonable sale price using the fundamentals as your guiding denominator. Usually, they are within range and the Insurance does not dispute and pay the claim.

In the policy form, it is up to the Artist to prove what the value of sales, so if they put an unrealistic sale price on the work, the insurance company using similar methods will determine the sale price is way over inflated.  At this juncture, an independent third party will then appraise the work and the valuation will be established, and the claim would be paid out accordingly.

Bottom line, price your work based on the merits of your talent and experience with keeping the ego in check.

New Artist Insurance Program custom designed for the serious Artist.

 

Limits start at $100,000

 

  • Exhibition
  • Transit,
  • Studio
  • Storage
  • Worldwide Coverage
  • Includes Material and commissioned work in progress
  • Visit artinsurancenow.com for all your Art insurance

 

Premiums start at $1000

 

Kindly help me get the word out by passing this along

 

Thank You

 

William

William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
T. 212 566-1881 ext 111
F. 212 566-1615
C. 917 863-8787
wfleischer@bfbond.com
www.BFbond.com
www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

Exhibition Policy or not?

Email regarding having Artist shows in an Office Environment.

I am an attorney, however, I put an art gallery in my law firm space. The agreement I have with the artists is that they allow me to hang their work for 3 to 4 weeks. I promote their work to my clients and throw a party in the artist’s honor, where the artists agree to be present and talk about art.

We serve some refreshments and invite everyone we see. There is no charge to the artist. I do not pay the artists. I do not sell art. There is no charge to the people who attend. It is a community event intended to bring a little culture to our small town and, admittedly, let people know where my office is without in-your-face law office marketing.

The rules in Iowa are the strictest in the country about regulating attorney advertising. I cannot hand someone a business card and say, “hi. I’m a lawyer. What can I do for you?” But, I can hand someone a party invitation flyer and say, “Hi, please come to my law firm’s gallery party and meet some cool artists, see some great art, listen to some inspiring music, and have a little wine and yummy appetizers. It’s so much fun!” I know. Crazy stupid.

When the party is over, the artists take their work away and three or four new artists bring in work to hang, and we do it all over again. My 4th party is November 14, 2014.

The artists for this party are asking if I have insurance to cover the art in the case of fire, vandalism, or theft. My insurance guy is not helpful. He says I have no insurable interest, so I cannot insure them with the exception that if I trip over them, my liability insurance might cover it. Lame.

The artist could sue me if something were to happen to their paintings while in my control. I do have an insurable interest, at least while they are in my custody and control.

Can you assist me in finding a way to obtain insurance or a bond of some type that will protect me in the case that something unthinkable would happen to these paintings?

Thank you,
Warmest regards,

The Answer… or my Answer.

When I further inquired I found the Artist work was hung without any paperwork. Interesting.

1. If the work was Loan during the show to the office, it may be covered under the office BOP policy, usually, there is $25,000 limit for Fine Art.

2. A dealer art insurance policy could be bought, for $150,000 on location limit, $30,000 Art Transit and $30,000 at unnamed locations.

3. Have the Artist buy their own Artist Insurance policy. $100,000 of Art Insurance while in transit, in the studio and while at Exhibitions for an annual price of $1,000.00.

4. Explain to the Artist,  it’s a business risk and art is a risky business.  The odds are higher of damaged or stolen while in transit, and less than their work in the studio, at lease your office is alarmed or locked 🙂

She explained to me even though a hold harmless could be drawn up and signed, there was still the exposure of a negligence lawsuit by the artist. So here is the question to ponder, buy insurance and not worry or understand it is a business risk you are taking verse the benefit of letting the people know your law office exists.

 

 

Insurance for Art Galleries

Our customized insurance policies are geared toward your typical Art Galleries, Museums, Exhibition space, and Dealer businesses.  We combine General Liability, Public Liability (Bodily Injury and Property Damage) into one straightforward policy along with non-salable contents, desks, chairs, computers, fixtures, racks and business property. Our policies can include landlords, curators, and artists as additionally insured.

 

Qualify for better pricing if you combine General Liability and Property Insurance into a Business-Owners Policy with Fine Arts Insured under a separate policy to maximize coverage while minimizing price.

 

A Business-Owners Policy includes: 

General Liability insurance coverage of an Art Gallery insurance policy is comparable to a typical commercial general liability policy, providing protection against claims of bodily injury or property damage for which your business may be liable.

General Liability means liability insurance for the cost of defending lawsuits stemming from:

  • Accidents which  cause bodily injury and/or property damage
  • Trip and Fall Incidents on premises.
  • Claims such as libel, slander, and False advertising
  • Errors or negligence from professional service is not covered by a General Liability Insurance policy. Must purchase a separate policy for this.
  • Business property insurance for physical assets, such as contents, improvements to your space including decorations and furnishings non-salable items.
  • Can cover loss of business income and extra expenses resulting from a covered loss.
  • Outdoor Sign
  • Insurance Money and Securities Insurance
  • Employee Dishonesty Insurance
  • Water Back-Up Insurance
  • Off Premises power failure

 

Broader coverage on a stand-alone fine art policy:  fine art while in the gallery, storage or while in transit,

 

The same type of coverages can be found in our Museum, Exhibition, Private Dealer, and Auction House insurance policies.

 

What is the average cost of Art Gallery Insurance? Premiums typically start around $600 but every art gallery has different requirements, property values, and coverage requirements. Prices will vary.

Please call William Fleischer, CIC at 212 566-1881 ext 111 or visit us at www.ArtInsuranceNow.com

 

APPLICATIONS:

Artist Insurance Policies include Studio, Exhibition and Transit protection.

Everything has a connection and a direction.  It all started one day while I was riding my Trek road bike on a 70-mile ride on the back roads of Piermont NY.  I always pass a sign which read: Open studio visits and Gallery. As I passed by I decided to stop and check it out. The driveway hill was an 11.5% grade, not fun on the bike but “Art” cheered me on!

I was met by “The Art Student League” Artist in residence program director Gary L. Sussman.  Many cyclists ride by, but it seems very few stop by, especially Art Insurance Consultants.

The Artists residence grounds are amazing. As I approached, I saw many buildings, a big barn, studio spaces and very nice living quarters.  Mr. Sussman explained to me the artist residency program which is pretty comprehensive. 100% of the artists are on full scholarship, no worries of cost, so they can fully focus on the creative process and the artistic energy to experiment and make amazing ART.

I explained to Sussman, a New Insurance program I had developed just for Artists, an Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance Program  that insures the finished art piece, percentage of finished in the process of a new piece of Art, while the artwork is at Exhibitions and while in transit, along with libraries and materials.

I further explained to him, what the nicest part about this policy is, there is no schedule, list, or inventory required of values at the time of placing the insurance but is required at the time of loss to prove what the current value is because the settlement is based on current market value minus 30%.  To establish the value at loss time, the artist would substantiate the claim by using previous sales, time and materials to create, photos and other tools which would justify the claim.

The key points of the policy are no schedule, the flexibility to have work made then displayed, Insuring work while in the studio, storage, transit and art shows. These Include materials, reference libraries, and tools.

For more information about this innovative policy and a fast free quote, contact us at www.artinsurancenow.com, fill out an application here or call us at 1.800.921.1008

 

William G. Fleischer, CIC
President
Bernard Fleischer and Sons

29 Broadway, Suite 1511
New York NY 10006
212 566-1881 ext 111
wfleischer@bfbond.com
ArtInsurancenow.com

APPLICATIONS:

What is Conversion exclusion in a fine art, Antique, Jewelry policy

The Story;

A collector or Museum consigns a work to a dealer to sell.  The dealer does his job and sells the work, but does not pay the Collector or Museum.  This is now considered a loss of property and if your current policy does not address this type of loss you may not have coverage.

Now if the consignment date has expired and the dealer is not willing to return the work, in many incidences this would be classified as theft and be covered by your fine arts policy.

For more information on Conversion Exclusion call us at 1.800.921.1008, visit our website at www.ArtInsuranceNow.com or fill out one of the applications below for a fast and easy quote.

APPLICATIONS:

Art Dealers
Artist Transit/Exhibition/Studio Insurance
Auctioneers
Conservators/Restorers
Personal Collections
Exhibitions
Museum Collections
Business Owners Liability